Hunts in Dreams

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Houghton Mifflin, 2000 - Fiction - 200 pages
3 Reviews
With HUNTS IN DREAMS, Tom Drury returns to the American Midwest -- the setting of his acclaimed first novel, THE END OF VANDALISM. He tells the powerful, nuanced, and often funny story of one October weekend in the lives of a precarious family. Everyone in HUNTS IN DREAMS wants something without knowing quite how to get it. Charles Darling covets an heirloom shotgun and will break the law, if necessary, to retrieve it. Joan Gower is drifting away from her marriage to Charles, hoping to reclaim an imaginative life. Their young son, Micah, prowls an empty town at night, testing the scope and reliability of his world. And Joan's daughter Lyris, after sixteen years as an orphan, seeks only a stable footing from which to begin the "perilous journey to adulthood."Sometimes together, sometimes independently, father, mother, son, and daughter move through a series of vivid encounters that demonstrate how even the most provisional family can endure in its own particular way.

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LibraryThing Review

User Review  - RandyMetcalfe - LibraryThing

Charles (formerly ‘Tiny’) Darling now has a wife, Joan, a young son, Micah, and an older step-daughter, Lyris, who had been given up for adoption at birth by Joan, but has been returned to her as a ... Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - viviennestrauss - LibraryThing

Not quite as compelling as The End of Vandalism but still very enjoyable. More than once I had a feeling of terrible dread that something truly awful would happen and then it didn't much to my relief. Read full review

Contents

Section 1
3
Section 2
20
Section 3
44
Copyright

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About the author (2000)

Tom Drury is the author of "The End of Vandalism" & "The Black Brook", one of Granta's "Best Young American Novelists," & a Guggenheim fellow for 2000-2001. His fiction has appeared most recently in "The New Yorker" & "Ploughshares". He lives with his wife & their daughter in Connecticut, where he teaches at Wesleyan University.

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