Hyperinflation and stabilization in Weimar Germany

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Oxford University Press, Incorporated, 1989 - Inflation (Finance) - 164 pages
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Tracing the links between the monetary phenomena of the post-World War I German inflation and its political roots, this study provides a non-technical explanation of the economics of inflation and explores the political events and institutions that contributed to the Weimar Republic's economic difficulties. Webb discusses such topics as Reichsbank credit and monetary policy; output and unemployment; government revenue and spending; capitalism, democracy, and reparations; and the political economy of Reichsbank policy.

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Contents

Inflation of Prices and Money
3
The Inflationary Policy Regime
23
Fiscal News and Inflationary Expectations
44
Copyright

8 other sections not shown

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About the author (1989)

Steven B. Webb worked at the World Bank for twenty-one years as an economist and advisor on policy research, evaluation and operations for Latin America and the Caribbean and other regions. He currently serves as a consultant to the Bank. Dr Webb's specializations include political economy, decentralization, public finance, central banks and monetary policy and economic history. His publications include Public Sector Reform What Works and Why (2008), Achievements and Challenges in Decentralization (2000) and Voting for Reform: The Politics of Adjustment in New Democracies (1994, edited with Stephan Haggard).

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