Hypothesis and the Spiral of Reflection: Levinas and the Politics of Reproduction

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SUNY Press, 1989 - Philosophy - 241 pages
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This book describes a realist, fallibilist alternative when intuitionism and its psychocentric ontology are rejected. Weissman proposes an agenda for metaphysical inquiry and also a method for testing metaphysical claims. Arguing that science and metaphysics are successive refinements of the maps and plans used in practical life, he affirms that metaphysics is to complete our self-understanding by locating us within a world we have not made.

This book is a sequel to Intuition and Ideality which surveys the many versions of intuitionism-intuitionism as it prescribes that reality be identified with mind itself or with the things set before our inspecting mind.
 

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Contents

III
17
IV
18
V
22
VI
25
VII
29
VIII
30
IX
34
X
36
XXXIV
144
XXXV
150
XXXVI
152
XXXVII
155
XXXVIII
157
XXXIX
158
XL
160
XLI
164

XI
39
XII
40
XIII
52
XIV
53
XV
59
XVII
63
XIX
67
XX
69
XXI
73
XXII
75
XXIII
78
XXIV
90
XXV
92
XXVI
96
XXVII
102
XXVIII
130
XXIX
136
XXX
139
XXXII
140
XXXIII
142
XLII
171
XLIII
176
XLIV
179
XLV
180
XLVI
181
XLVIII
183
L
185
LI
187
LII
189
LIII
197
LIV
202
LV
204
LVI
205
LVII
206
LVIII
217
LIX
218
LX
223
LXI
227
LXII
233
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Page 2 - is not just one of man's possessions in the world, but on it depends the fact that man has a world at all.
Page 2 - The quest of a simplest, clearest overall pattern of canonical notation is not to be distinguished from a quest of ultimate categories, a limning of the most general traits of reality.
Page 2 - The experience of the world in language is "absolute." It transcends all the relativities of the positing of being, because it embraces all being-in-itself, in whatever relationships (relativities) it appears. The linguistic quality of our experience of the world is prior, as contrasted with everything that is recognized and addressed as being. The fundamental relation of language and world does not, then, mean that the world becomes the object of language.
Page 2 - world" only insofar as it comes into language, but language, too, has its real being only in the fact that the world is re-presented within it...

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About the author (1989)

David Weissman is Professor of Philosophy at City College of New York. He is the author of Intuition and Ideality, also published by SUNY Press.

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