I Can See You Naked

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Andrews McMeel Publishing, Jun 1, 1992 - Business & Economics - 336 pages
1 Review
This may be the best piece of advice in this book:

When something strikes you as funny, don't let it get away. Hold on to it for dear life. It could be gold. My theory is this: Everything that strikes you as funny is going to turn up on television some day.

I'll just give you this one example—because it relates directly to the book you're reading.

For as long as I can remember, I've always thought that the old idea of visualizing an audience naked, as a way to control nervousness, was a funny sort of notion. It just struck me funny.

I mean, it's not one of those ideas that flits in and out of your mind. It sticks. And it asks for some kind of response.

So, I made it the title of a book on presentations.

I Can See You Naked.

Need I tell you what happened next?

The idea spread across the networks like a giggle through a classroom. Millions upon millions of people are howling their heads off about this quirky notion of speakers talking to naked audiences. It's hilarious. Dynamite. A TV writer's dream come true.

Then, amidst the laughter, a question hit me: Had my book unleashed all of this hilarity?

Surely not. But how many speakers would now visualize their next audience in a state of dishabille? I shuddered to think of it.

If you're a presenter, a naked audience is not going to improve your concentration. Eye contact is going to be a real problem for you. And you're going to be very self-conscious about that $600 designer suit you're wearing.

This was all dutifully explained in I Can See You Naked—the first edition. But something told me it was time for new emphasis. Even with the relaxed morality that pervades our TV sets and movie screens, there remains a statement that must be resaid:

Never speak to a naked audience. It can be distracting.

There are all kinds of other psychological exercises that can be tapped to rid yourself of nervousness in the face of an awaiting audience. One woman even wrote to tell me that Chapter 13, which starts, "It's the night before your big presentation" enabled her to keep her sanity. Can you imagine? I considered changing the title of the book to reflect that thought, then decided that a promise of sanity was probably more that I could deliver—times being what they are.

As with the first edition, this expanded edition is dedicated to helping you be a better presenter. But it is also dedicated to candor, to saying things that—for one reason or another—never show up in other books on presentation.

Who else would tell you "to keep an eye out for the barracuda?" (Chapter 51). Who else would tell you that "you may have been in the wrong place at the wrong time?" (Chapter 17). Who else would employ the Mafia to give you a pointer or two on presentations? (Chapter 31).

In short, this is a very different book on presentations. It's even different from the first edition of I Can See You Naked, which still strikes me as a funny notion, great for sitcoms—but now there are other things to laugh about, look at, learn from, and try as you get ready to make your next presentation.

 

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Contents

PART
29
How to warm up an audience without a Catskills comic
36
Whos going to be Stanley Kubrick?
45
How to get the best out of nervousnessand control the rest
51
Sometimes the best offense is to let your guard down
57
The worlds smallest secretfor presenters who like
63
PART FOUR Im so boring I even bore myself How to get out of the gray
69
What TV has taught us but most presenters ignore
71
The audience is much olderor much youngerthan you Either way the Age Gap can be trouble
190
What audiences know without being told
194
Questions that often float through the minds of audiences
197
Who wants to get hit by a truck?
200
The Man in the Box
204
The audience needs a breakbut when?
207
How to eliminate audiences and start reading faces
212
It can sound an alarm without making a sound
215

Podiums are poison Lecterns are lethal
80
Theres nothing more boring than something that never moves
83
How do you create excitement if youre not Madonna Prince or Zig Ziglar?
87
They call it chemistry
94
Great props dont have to be proper
99
powerful but explosive
104
Its low tech on a high wire
111
Im speaking to what I see in your eyes
116
Spend a day with your voice
121
Rapture of the deep can steal defeat from the jaws of victory
124
A true story about Valium
128
How to make a speech in a strange hotel
130
The Electronic Presenter
138
Are you Red Blue or Gray? How to find yourself in the presentation spectrum
144
How to pull yourself out of the Gray Zone
153
Are you the presenter you think you are? A selfanalysis to help you find out
157
PART FIVE Understanding the audience How to get inside their heads
165
How to become one with your audiencewith a little help from Jackie Mason
167
A simple structure for your next presentation Its All About Them
175
What to wear to a winning presentation when youre the presenter
182
Is it helpful harmful or just hot air?
187
If you dont give me a list Audiences just love do lists
219
Nerve Endings Insensitivity can overpower any subject
222
Test your mettle as a presenter
228
Hold that temper
233
Heyyouve drawn a crowd
235
Your best chance to work a miracle
239
Ten points to pin to the wall before your next oneonone
242
A guide to relationshipsthe hot new word in making presentations
248
The Deadly Gamecompetitive presentations and how to win them
254
PART SIX How to deal with questions
267
What no questions really means
269
Questions that top executives like to askand some suggestions that may save the day
272
The short form list for answering questions
275
How to handle questions that are really suggestions
279
Never incur the wrath of a talky crusader
282
Tell me about OM The dynamics of Donahue
290
PART EIGHT
297
Compliments countercompliments and presentation diaries
307
Heres looking at you kidon viewing your first videotape
313
Epilogue
320
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500 Tips for Trainers
Phil Race,Brenda Smith
No preview available - 1995
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