I Ching: The Chameleon Book

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Brazos Media, 2005 - 244 pages
3 Reviews
The I Ching (Yijing) is an important text in the canon of world literature. It is also a divination tool familiar to millions of modern users. Books on the I Ching tend to approach it exclusively as one or the other: literary text or oracle. This annotated translation is designed to reconcile a century of provocative new scholarship with the function of divination for the modern reader. The most exciting new scholarship illuminates the epic tale of wise King Wen, valorous King Wu, and the rise of the Zhou dynasty. The emergence of this wonderful story explains countless cryptic allusions in the I Ching. It also provides an elegant way to recover the divinatory function for the modern reader, and suggests how it may have functioned for the original diviners. In this view, to make a divination is to read the moment against the dynasty change narrative -- truly to "consult King Wen."
 

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What an uncommonly revealing look at the I Ching! Most common interpretations seem like misleading conjecture & indulgently wishful projection after reading this one. Takes away the confusion and frustration I have encountered trying to make sense of my personal readings.
Not only does this book explain the actual historical realities the hexagrams were based on: it's also light and humorous reading. The author brings a knowledge of Chinese herbal medicine to the table showing hidden undertones of meaning that are woven into the I Ching.
From time-to-time there is a useful practical conclusion offered from the lines. My only wish would be to include more of these distilled recommendations which can be applied in the real world as in hexagram 29, line 5. I would indeed buy such a book and wear it out with daily use.
 

Contents

III
1
IV
4
V
8
VI
11
VII
14
VIII
17
IX
20
X
24
XXXVIII
106
XXXIX
110
XL
112
XLI
115
XLII
118
XLIII
121
XLIV
124
XLV
127

XI
28
XII
32
XIII
35
XIV
38
XV
41
XVI
44
XVII
47
XVIII
50
XIX
52
XX
55
XXI
58
XXII
61
XXIII
64
XXIV
67
XXV
70
XXVI
73
XXVII
76
XXVIII
78
XXIX
80
XXX
82
XXXI
86
XXXII
89
XXXIII
92
XXXIV
95
XXXV
97
XXXVI
99
XXXVII
103
XLVI
131
XLVII
134
XLVIII
137
XLIX
140
L
143
LI
146
LII
149
LIII
152
LIV
155
LV
157
LVI
160
LVII
163
LVIII
166
LIX
170
LX
173
LXI
175
LXII
178
LXIII
181
LXIV
184
LXV
187
LXVI
190
LXVII
193
LXVIII
199
LXIX
205
LXX
246
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Page 8 - Shaanxi, centred in the valley of the Wei River, a tributary of the Yellow River...

About the author (2005)

Freeman Crouch is a retired teacher. In the early 2000s he spent a lot of time reading about bronze-age China and the Mawangdui manuscript, and gradually pieced together a translation and commentary of the original core of the I Ching -- the Zhouyi -- using the cutting-edge scholarship of that time. He also spent a lot of time online conversing with a number of kind and brilliant people about the Yijing, whom he still remembers with gratitude. (You know who you are.)

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