I Dare You!

Front Cover
Cosimo, Inc., Nov 1, 2006 - Self-Help - 152 pages
2 Reviews
American entrepreneur and philanthropist WILLIAM H. DANFORTH (1870-1956) is most famous for founding the Ralston Purina Company, but he also helped launch the American Youth Foundation in 1925 as a resource for spurring kids to becoming the best they can be. The spirit of his can-do philosophy is encapsulated here, in this cheerful and inspiring guide to being a creative, adventurous, magnetic, successful, daring person at any age. For decades, I Dare You!-with its honest, heartfelt advice and entertaining and enlightening anecdotes-has encouraged and motivated children and adults alike to take control of their lives and become the happy, fulfilled people they've always dreamed of being. As relevant and necessary today as it was when it was first published more than 70 years ago, this is a book to treasure and to share.

From inside the book

What people are saying - Write a review

User Review - Flag as inappropriate

I dare you to get and read (and reread) this book. If this book doesn't change your life for the better then you are stuck in complacency and DO NOT WANT to improve. Life truths come forth from nearly every page with copious examples to illustrate them. Please, for your (and others) benefit, get this masterpiece!  

User Review - Flag as inappropriate

This book is a very inspirational piece of work. If you are feeling down, or you feel you need something to help motivate you get back on your feet and do something, I highly recommend reading this book. Danforth uses actual events to show how you can actually succeed with a can-do attitude. Read this book and your life is sure to take a turn for the better. Be all that you can be, and nothing less. 

Contents

III
1
IV
5
V
8
VI
13
VII
21
VIII
24
IX
64
X
81
XI
93
XII
105
XIII
116
Copyright

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 26 - The player on the other side is hidden from us. We know that his play is always fair, just, and patient. But also we know, to our cost, that he never overlooks a mistake, or makes the smallest allowance for ignorance. To the man who plays well, the highest stakes are paid, with that sort of overflowing generosity with which the strong shows delight in strength. And one who plays ill is checkmated, — without haste, but without remorse.
Page 27 - the health of the people is really the foundation upon which all their happiness and all their powers as a state depend.
Page 25 - Yet it is a very plain and elementary truth, that the life, the fortune, and the happiness of every one of us, and, more or less, of those who are connected with us, do depend upon our knowing something of the rules of a game infinitely more difficult and complicated than chess. It is a game which has been...
Page 72 - THE NORTH WIND AND THE SUN. THE North Wind and the Sun disputed which was the most powerful, and agreed that he should be declared the victor, who could first strip a wayfaring man of his clothes. The North Wind first tried his power, and blew with all his might: but the keener became his blasts, the closer the Traveller...
Page 7 - Our most valuable possessions are those which can be shared without lessening — those which, when shared, multiply. Our least valuable possessions, on the other hand, are those which, when divided, are diminished.
Page 33 - Two miles of oxygen three times a day. This is not only the best, but cheap and pleasant to take. It suits all ages and constitutions. It is patented by Infinite Wisdom, sealed with a signet divine. It cures cold feet, hot heads, pale faces, feeble lungs and bad tempers. If two or three take it together it has a still more striking effect. It has often been known to reconcile enemies, settle matrimonial quarrels and bring reluctant parties to a state of double blessedness. This medicine never fails....
Page 6 - The only true measure of success is the ratio between what we might have been and what we might have done, on the one hand, and the thing we have made and the thing we have made of ourselves, on the other.
Page 32 - The best medicine! Two miles of oxygen three times a day. This is not only the best, but cheap and pleasant to take. It suits all ages and constitutions. It is patented by infinite wisdom, sealed with a signet divine. It cures cold feet, hot heads, pale faces, feeble lungs, and bad tempers. If two or three take it together, it has a still more striking effect. It has often been known to reconcile enemies, settle matrimonial quarrels, and bring reluctant parties to a state of double blessedness.

Bibliographic information