I. I-em-hotep and Ancient Egyptian Medicine: II. Prevention of Valvular Disease. The Harveian Oration Delivered Before the Royal College of Physicians on June 21, 1904

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C. J. Clay and sons, 1904 - Heart valves - 34 pages
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Page 15 - When the heart is diseased its work is imperfectly performed; the vessels proceeding from the heart become inactive, so that you cannot feel them" (no doubt this is a reference to changes in the pulse): "they become full of air and water. When the heart is dilated the vessels from it contain effete matter. If a suppurative or putrefactive disease occur in the body...
Page 5 - the good physician of gods and men, a kind and merciful god assuaging the sufferings of those in pain, healing the diseases of men, giving peaceful sleep to the restless and suffering'.
Page 7 - I-em-hotep himself. Some of those who are present to-day when visiting the site of the temple of I-em-hotep have been impressed by the thought that on this spot, long before Asklepios, the source, or Hippocrates, commonly called the father of medicine, were born, probably before the Homeric poems...
Page 9 - Tosorthros, of the third dynasty, five or six thousand years ago, we meet with the wise I-em-hotep in an inscription referring to the seven years of famine which befell Egypt in consequence of a succession of low Niles. He is there the adviser of Pharaoh ; to him the king applies in his trouble for counsel and help.1 In the inscriptions in the temple of Edfu* he is described at length as the great priest I-em-hotep, the son of Ptah, who speaks or lectures.3 Perhaps his discourses or lectures were...
Page 24 - Egypt. the first to stop decayed teeth with gold. I may add that Ebers states that twenty distinct diseases of the eye are referred to in the papyri, and Dr. Grant Bey asserts that the operation for cataract was practised in ancient Egypt.1 As regards materia medica the Egyptians possessed the following drugs : — lactuca, various salts of lead, such as the sulphate, with the action of which in allaying local inflammation they were well acquainted ; pomegranate and acanthus pith as vermifuges ;...
Page 8 - Ill, 1841, p. 40 of the nature of human life, strove to prolong it, to assuage suffering, and to cure disease. They studied and treated many of the ailments familiar to us, such as tubercle, leprosy, plague, anaemia, and other diseases prevalent in Egypt to-day. Near the site of this temple, securely sealed in an earthen vessel which had been hidden in the sand, was found one of the medical papyri from which I shall quote some passages ; doubtless it belonged to an early physician who sought, perhaps...
Page 17 - In another place (folio 102) the heart is spoken of as being full of blood which comes or flows from it again. In folio 39, after a description of symptoms, follows a statement to the effect that the heart is distended, the sick man is short of breath because the blood has stagnated and does not circulate.
Page 10 - Egyptians had discovered certain elementary facts and knew as much as the Greeks, as much as we find in the Hippocratic writings, or in those of Aristotle and the later Alexandrian school, and the hypothesis seems a natural one that the knowledge possessed by the Greeks was acquired from Egypt. NECROPSIES MADE BY THE EGYPTIAN PRIESTS It is of some interest to note that these priests of I-em-hotep, themselves learned men, not only saw and prescribed daily for vast numbers of sick persons but also...
Page 1 - ... love our venerable and beneficent profession the spectacle of our predecessors in early ages striving in darkness and difficulty to acquire that hidden knowledge to which we have partially attained is interesting and should awaken our sympathy. As was remarked by the learned Harveian Orator of 1 896 : 'The past is worth our study and ever more so the further we advance.'1 The information which archaeological research has of late afforded, though in a fitful and partial manner, as to the earliest...

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