I, Mary MacLane: A Diary of Human Days

Front Cover
F.A. Stokes Company, 1917 - Montana - 317 pages
1 Review
Reviews aren't verified, but Google checks for and removes fake content when it's identified
With candid memoirs like I, Mary MacLane, this controversial Canadian writer helped to usher in a new era of confessional autobiography and to remake the notion of what constituted acceptable subject matter for female essayists and authors. Setting down thoughts and events both quotidian and scandalous in an inimitably unique voice, Mary MacLane is one of the most important literary figures of the early twentieth century.--Publisher description.
 

What people are saying - Write a review

Reviews aren't verified, but Google checks for and removes fake content when it's identified

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - MSarki - LibraryThing

…You were honest since you made no pretense of any kind to yourself. You took no gold that you did not logically, humanely, or shamefully earn. You were consciously and unconsciously above all ... Read full review

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 113 - Oh Thou, who didst with pitfall and with gin Beset the Road I was to wander in, Thou wilt not with Predestined Evil round Enmesh, and then impute my Fall to Sin!
Page 134 - The sun was risen upon the earth when Lot entered into Zoar. Then the LORD rained upon Sodom and upon Gomorrah brimstone and fire from the LORD out of heaven; and he overthrew those cities, and all the plain, and all the inhabitants of the cities, and that which grew upon the ground. But his wife looked back from behind him, and she became a pillar of salt.
Page 123 - As I was going to St. Ives, I met a man with seven wives, Every wife had seven sacks, Every sack had seven cats, Every cat had seven kits — Kits, cats, sacks, and wives, How many were going to St. Ives?
Page 270 - this my son was dead, and is alive ! was lost, and is found !" Thus shall every true penitent be welcomed by a gracious God.
Page 172 - Garcia's knife, which I had taken when I broke mine in his throat. She fell at the second thrust, without a cry. It seems to me that I can still see her great black eyes steadily fixed on me ; then they became dimmed and closed. I remained completely prostrated for a good hour beside the body. Then I remembered that Carmen had often told me that she would like to be buried in a wood. I dug her a grave with my knife, and placed her in it. I searched a long time for...
Page 141 - We had such a hard year in 1905 that I destroyed my diary did not want to read it — ." Mary MacLane, very aware of the charged experience of encountering past selves in the pages of her journal writes: "I write this book for my own reading. / It is my postulate to myself. / As I read it it makes me clench my teeth savagely: and coldly tranquilly close my eyelids: it makes me love and loathe Me, Soul and bones
Page 171 - you ask me to do what is impossible. I no longer love you ; you love me still, and for that reason you want to kill me. I could very easily lie to you, but do not care to take the trouble. All is over between us. As my torn, you have the right to kill your romi, but Carmen will always be free. Calli she was born, and Calli she will die I "
Page 2 - ... am a specialized being, deeply myself. I am of woman-sex and most things that go with that, with some other pointes. I am dynamic but devastated, laid waste in spirit. I'm like a leopard and I'm like a poet and I'm like a religieuse and I'm like an outlaw. I have a potent weird sense of humor — a saving and a demoralizing grace. I have brain, cerebration — not powerful but fine and of a remarkable quality. I am scornful-tempered and I am brave. I am slender in body and someway fragile and...
Page 1 - I am vain and shallow and false. I am a specialized being, deeply myself. I am of woman-sex and most things that go with that, with some other pointes. I am dynamic but devastated, laid waste in spirit. I'm like a leopard and I'm like a poet and I'm like a religieuse and I'm like an outlaw. I have a potent weird sense of humor — a saving and a demoralizing grace. I have brain, cerebration — not powerful but fine and of a remarkable quality. I am scornful-tempered...
Page 189 - I don't know whether I write this because I wear two plain dresses or whether I wear two plain dresses because I write it." The statement makes one ask to what extent Helen Ward Brandreth "plots" the romantic episodes of her life in order that they be available to "Fannie Fern...

Bibliographic information