I Mix what I Like!: A Mixtape Manifesto

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AK Press, 2011 - Music - 226 pages
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In a moment of increasing corporate control in the music industry, Jared A. Ball analyzes the colonization and control of popular music and posits the homemade hip-hop mixtape as an emancipatory tool for community resistance. Equally at home in a post-colonial studies class and on the shelves of an indie record store, I Mix What I Like! is a revolutionary investigation of the cultural dimension of anti-racist organizing in African America.

"Jared Ball is determined to rescue hip hop and left activism from increasingly subversive corporate control. This book is a manifesto that needs to be read, argued about, and yelled from the rooftops. Let the bricks fly!" —Todd Steven Burroughs, co-author of Civil Rights Chronicle

"The Funkiest Journalist breaks it all down for all servants of Soul/Funk music and Art in the 21st Century. His Mixtape Manifesto explains what we are up against battling corporate empires that control the coveted consumer-merchant access points, and offers us an option to distribute, connect, and popularize our culture."—Head Roc, political hip-hop artist

"The revolutionary power of this book lies in its capacity to interrogate staid constructs of thought and re-pose vital questions pertaining to 'emancipatory journalism.' For the power to pose the question is the greatest power of all."—Frank B. Wilderson, III, author of Incognegro

 

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Contents

Acknowledgments
1
A Prefatory Note to the Reader
3
Introduction
9
1 The Colonized Rhythm Nation
19
2 Media as Ideology Culture and Colonialism
47
3 Education and Conceptual Boundaries
57
4 Journalistm and Conceptual Boundaries
65
5 Revisiting the Corporation and Cultural Industry
71
A Cast Study in the Colonizing Function of Radio
95
10 National Public Radio as Fanons RadioAlger
113
11 Managed Outcomes
117
12 The Mixtap and Emancipatory Journalism
121
The Original Mixtape Radio Show
135
14 White Liberalism and Progressive Journalism
141
Conclusion
149
Selected Bibliography
157

6 The Politics of Popular Culture
75
7 Intellectual Property Copyright and the Ownership of Thought
81
8 Payola and Playlists
91
Notes
165
About the Author
229
Copyright

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About the author (2011)

Jared A. Ball is a founding member of several grassroots Washington, DC-based organizations. He is frequently heard on radio stations in the Washington D.C. area and is the founder and producer of FreeMix Radio: The Original Mixtape Radio Show, an emancipatory journalistic political mixtape. Ball is assistant professor of communication studies at Morgan State University where his research interests include the development of alternative/underground journalism and cultural expression as mechanisms of social movements and political organization 

James Turner is the founder of the Africana Studies and Research Center--founded 1969--and a professor of African and African American Politics and Social Policy at Cornell University. He also organized Cornell's Council on African Studies, forming a basis for the university's interdisciplinary African Studies. Turner holds a B.S. from Central Michigan University, an M.A. from Northwestern University, a certificate in African Studies from Northwestern's African Studies Center, and a Ph.D. from the Union Graduate School in Cincinnati.

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