I'm Hungry, Daddy

Front Cover
Random House Australia, 2002 - Alcoholics - 330 pages
"In the tradition of Don't Let Her See Me Cryand The Long Way Home, a starkly beautiful and inspirational true story of the power of love - and how hope can be found in the darkest places. As a boy growing up in during the Depression, Cliff Nichols watched alcohol rob his mother of her hope, her beauty, her life. And he vowed he'd never touch a drop.Until one night, at the age of nineteen, he said to a mate, 'One beer can't hurt, can it?' By the age of thirty-six Cliff is homeless, shattered and walking skid row. His talents and dreams in ruins, his life has become an endless round of drinks in dingy inner city hotels and flophouses, parks, railway platforms and even gutters. And by his side is his small daughter Helen. The unwavering love of Helen and the loyalty and support of his father sustain Cliff throughout his long and heartbreaking battle with alcohol. Finally, he finds the courage to not only break the cycle of alcoholism but the cycle of his loneliness and fear. As he begins to rebuild his shattered life, Cliff meets a woman whose love brings the healing, inner peace and sense of belonging he has been searching for all his life."
 

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Contents

Jarocin Avenue Glebe
14
Man of the World
43
The Proposal
65
Farewell to Khaki
93
Heartache
121
Hitting Rock Bottom
134
Short of Breath
155
Bumpers Gunshots and Beaten
175
The Parting
194
Blackouts
211
The Kindness of Kath
229
A Spiritual Awakening
243
Counting My Losses
270
Separate Ways
291
The Unexpected
316
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About the author (2002)

In his youth Cliff s passion for music was paramount. Starting in the Glebe District Silver Band at the age of seven, Cliff played tenor horn, cornet, trumpet, trombone and piano accordion for Army Bands in Sydney, Tokyo and Brisbane. Cliff found civilian life hard and worked many jobs while trying to survive, including cleaner, labourer, and private detective. Today he lives in Tweed Heads with his wife Dian and children and granchildren.

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