I'm Not Stiller

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Dalkey Archive Press, 1958 - Fiction - 377 pages
7 Reviews
Arrested and imprisoned in a small Swiss town, a prisoner begins this book with an exclamation: "I'm not Stiller!" He claims that his name is Jim White, that he has been jailed under false charges and under the wrong identity. To prove he is who he claims to be, he confesses to three unsolved murders and recalls in great detail an adventuresome life in America and Mexico among cowboys and peasants, in back alleys and docks. He is consumed by "the morbid impulse to convince," but no one believes him.

This is a harrowing account—part Kafka, part Camus—of the power of self-deception and the freedom that ultimately lies in self-acceptance. Simultaneously haunting and humorous, I'm Not Stiller has come to be recognized as "one of the major post-war works of fiction" and a masterpiece of German literature.
 

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User Review  - hbergander - LibraryThing

Widespread novel at the top of German prose about the communicable and the unspeakable of a complex personality. Read full review

Review: I'm Not Stiller

User Review  - Deana - Goodreads

I don't know if I'll ever finish this book, because I lost it. Maybe I'll stumble across it some day. Read full review

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Contents

I
3
II
5
III
72
IV
130
V
172
VI
200
VII
217
VIII
272
IX
331
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About the author (1958)

Max Frisch was born in Switzerland in 1911. He attended the University of Zurich and spent six years in the Swiss Army. He also worked as a freelance writer and an architect. Frisch is most famous for writing the novel I'm Not Stiller and the play The Firebugs. Both works explore one of Frisch's major themes: the problematic nature of living life without a true understanding of one's identity. Many of his works feature explore this theme, including the plays The Chinese Wall, Andorra: A Play in Twelve Scenes, and Don Juan; or the Love of Geometry. He has also written several other novels, including Homo Faber: A Report, and Man in the Holocene. Frisch was awarded the International Neustadt Prize for Literature in 1987. He died in 1991 in Zurich.

Michael Bullock, himself a novelist and poet, was for many years the official translator of Max Frisch. His translations of books and plays from French and German now number close to 200 and have received many awards.

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