Identity Without Selfhood: Simone de Beauvoir and Bisexuality

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Cambridge University Press, Apr 22, 1999 - Psychology - 215 pages
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Identity without Selfhood proposes a conception of identity and subjectivity in the context of recent post-structuralist and queer debates. The author argues that efforts to analyse and even 'deconstruct' identity and selfhood still rely on certain core Western techniques of identity such as individuality, boundedness, autonomy, self-realisation and narrative. In a detailed study of biographical, media and academic representations of Simone de Beauvoir, Dr Fraser illustrates that bisexuality, by contrast, is discursively produced as an identity which exceeds the confines of the self and especially the individuality ascribed to de Beauvoir. In the course of this analysis, she draws attention to the high costs incurred by processes of subjectification. it is in the light of these costs that, while drawing substantially on, and expanding, Foucault's notion of techniques of the self, the argument presented in the book also offers a critique of Foucault's work from a Deleuzo-Guattarian perspective.
 

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Contents

Introduction
1
Identity and selfhood
4
Identity and embodiment
25
Telling tales
47
Preclusion
79
Displacement
102
Erasure
124
Lose your face
141
Conclusion
164
Notes
171
References
197
Index
210
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