Identity and Control: How Social Formations Emerge

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Princeton University Press, 2008 - Political Science - 427 pages

In this completely revised edition of one of the foundational texts of network sociology, Harrison White refines and enlarges his groundbreaking theory of how social structure and culture emerge from the chaos and uncertainty of social life. Incorporating new contributions from a group of young sociologists and many fascinating and novel case studies, Identity and Control is the only major book of social theory that links social structure with the lived experience of individuals, providing a rich perspective on the kinds of social formations that develop in the process. Going beyond traditional sociological dichotomies such as agency/structure, individual/society, or micro/macro, Identity and Control presents a toolbox of concepts that will be useful to a wide range of social scientists, as well as those working in public policy, management, or associational life and, beyond, to any reader who is interested in understanding the dynamics of social life.

 

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Contents

Identities Seek Control
1
Networks and Stories
20
Three Disciplines
63
Styles
112
Institutions and Rhetorics
171
Regimes of Control
220
Getting Action
279
Overview and Contexts
334
REFERENCES
377
INDEX
419
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About the author (2008)

Harrison C. White is the Giddings Professor of Sociology at Columbia University. His books include Markets from Networks: Socioeconomic Models of Production (Princeton) and Careers and Creativity: Social Forces in the Arts.

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