Igerne and Other Writings

Front Cover
De Vinne Press, 1897 - American essays - 372 pages
0 Reviews
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 300 - I go upon my farm, or into the garden and prune the fruit-trees, or perform some other work about them which they need, and then go back to my books. I do not often drive out, preferring to walk. " In the country, I dine early; and it is only at that meal that I take either meat or fish, and of these but a moderate quantity, making my dinner mostly of vegetables. At the meal which is called tea I only take a little bread and butter, with fruit if it be on the table. In town, where I dine later, I...
Page 300 - Post, nearly three miles distant, and after about three hours, return, always walking, whatever be the weather or the state of the streets. In the country I am engaged in my literary tasks till a. feeling of weariness drives me out...
Page 300 - At the meal which is called tea I take only a little bread and butter, with fruit, if it be on the table. In town, where I dine later, I make but two meals a day. Fruit makes a considerable part of my diet, and I eat it at almost any hour of the day without inconvenience. My drink is water, yet I sometimes, though rarely, take a glass of wine. I am a natural temperance man, finding myself rather confused than exhilarated by wine. I never meddle with tobacco, except to quarrel with its use. " That...
Page 301 - Yet let no empty gust Of passion find an utterance in thy lay, A blast that whirls the dust Along the howling street and dies away; But feelings of calm power and mighty sweep, 35 Like currents journeying through the windless deep.
Page 296 - ... gaze, And steers, undoubting, to the friendly coast ; And they who stray in perilous wastes, by night, Are glad when thou dost shine to guide their footsteps right. And, therefore, bards of old, Sages, and hermits of the solemn wood, Did in thy beams behold A beauteous type of that unchanging good, That bright eternal beacon, by whose ray The voyager of time should shape his heedful way.
Page 300 - ... a moderate quantity, making my dinner mostly of vegetables. At the meal which is called tea, I take only a little bread and butter, with fruit, if it be on the table. In town, where I dine later, I make but two meals a day. Fruit makes a considerable part of my diet, and I eat it at almost any hour of the day without inconvenience. My drink is water, yet I sometimes, though rarely, take a glass of wine.
Page 300 - In the country I am engaged in my literary tasks till a feeling of weariness drives me out into the open air, and I go upon my farm or into the garden and prune the trees, or perform some other work about them which they need and then go back to my books. I do not often drive out, preferring to walk. In the country I dine early, and it is only at that meal that I take either meat or fish, and of these but a moderate quantity, making my dinner mostly of vegetables. At the meal which is called tea,...
Page 99 - ... tendency to parade by no means alters the fact, that he does possess in an extraordinary degree the intellectual and moral virtues that he would exaggerate in his own eyes and the eyes of others. Independence, resolution, courage, insight must have been his in amplest store or he would never have been able to Get the start of the majestic world And bear the palm alone; (1.
Page 369 - Tennesseean and a Democrat. He springs from that sturdy pioneer stock which, if Democracy had not existed, would have invented it in Tennessee. Invited by their own bold hearts, they crossed the mountains, and here in the virgin freedom of the wilderness they founded this State in that liberty which...
Page 131 - I went up to him and asked if he could tell me where the old manor-house had stood in Church Street, for it was there that grim Dr. Busby had his school. " You are after Poe," said he, smiling, and taking off his eye-glasses as he folded up his

Bibliographic information