Illuminated Manuscripts in Classical and Mediaeval Times: And Their Art and Their Technique

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Cambridge University Press, Jun 10, 2010 - Language Arts & Disciplines - 270 pages
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Originally published in 1892, this volume provides a general account of the various aspects of manuscript illumination from Classical times to the sixteenth century, when the invention of printing gradually began to put an end to the use of manuscripts. The text contains a historical sketch of the growth and development of various styles of manuscript illumination and the chief technical procedures involved, such as the highly labour-intensive process of applying gold leaf. Numerous illustrative examples are also provided. This is a beautifully presented book that will be of value to anyone with an interest in manuscripts and the history of art.
 

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Contents

Classical Manuscripts written with a Stilus
1
Classical Manuscripts written with Pen and
11
Page 31 to
44
Page 126 to 146
58
Page 45 to
61
Page 62 to
79
The AngloSaxon School of Manuscripts
104
Emperor Henry II the designs used for stained glass the advance
121
The Illuminated Manuscripts of Italy and Spain
183
illuminators mentioned by Dante Missal in the Chapter library
204
inks writing in gold the illuminators pens and pencils the leadpoint
217
it their quiet monotonous life examples of monastic humour
233
Page 224 to
238
made of cotton of wool and of linen the dates and places of
244
Page 239 to
256
Page 257 to
257

Page 106 to
125
Printed Books with painted Illuminations
147
APPENDIX Page 265 to
270
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