Illuminating Video: An Essential Guide to Video Art

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Doug Hall, Sally Jo Fifer
Aperture, 1990 - Photography - 566 pages
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Illuminating Video is the most comprehensive collection of essays on video art, as well as an essential text for the general reader interested in new visual forms. It is a significant resource for anyone who is involved in new media, video art, art history, or contemporary social theory.

The volume offers insights by several prominent artists in the field as well as revealing and instructive writings by both scholars and critics. It illustrates the complex, heterogeneous nature of video, and highlights its strong ties to the visual arts and social theory. While providing an essential critical context for understanding video's role as art, these writings show that video is at the forefront of contemporary cultural and aesthetic discourse. Using a wide range of strategies, from the poetic to the reconstructive, these essays provide a long-overdue academic-friendly context in which to evaluate video as art and its subsequent impact on social and cultural behavior.

Editors Hall and Fifer have organized the book into five sections that address the varied aspects of video. From essays investigating the construction of a history of video; to articles on the relation(s) of video to other media, fine art, and culture; to pieces specifically created by leading video artists for this publication; Illuminating Video has much to offer any student or scholar of video production or aestheics.

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From the first portapak productions, video art has been a purposeful outsider on the margins of official aesthetic acceptability. This collection of 41 essays by American video artists, scholars, and ... Read full review

Contents

Acknowledgments
8
Preface David Bolt
9
Foreword David A Ross
10
Complexities of an Art Form Doug Hall and Sally Jo Fifer Histories
13
Shedding the Utopian Moment Martha Rosler
31
A Brief History of American Documentary Video Deirdre Boyle
51
Notes Toward a Reexamination of the Origins of Video Art John G Hanhardt
71
Whats TV Got To Do With It? Kathy Roe Huffman
81
Latinos and Media Art Coco Fusco
304
Behind the Image Muntadas
317
Three Interactive Videodiscs 198190
321
Syntax and Genre 331 The Cultural Logic of Video Maureen Turim
331
The Smell of Turpentine Juan Downey
343
Taking a Close Look and Listen Bruce Ferguson
349
Untitled Joan Jonas
366
Audience Culture and the Video Screen Norman M Klein
375

And if the Right Hand did not know What the Left Hand is doing Gary Hill
91
Great Expectations and the Making of a History Marita Sturken
101
The Room with the American View
125
Vito Acconci
126
Performance Video and Trouble in the Home Kathy ODell
135
The Body the Image and the SpaceinBetween Margaret Morse
153
Video in Relation to Architecture Dan Graham
168
Videos New Architecture Meets Corporate Sponsorship Dara Birnbaum
189
The Art of The Possible Francesc Torres
205
o Mobility As American as Chip Lord 215 Aligning The Museum Reaction Piece Howard Fried
215
AccessControl 226 The Feminism Factor Video and its Relation to Feminism Martha Gever
226
The Medium Is the Mess age Bruce and Norman Yonemoto
242
This Is Not a Paradox Judith Barry
249
The Wild Things on the Banks of the Free Flow Dee Dee Halleck
259
The Fantasy Beyond Control Lynn Hershman
267
The Romance of Interactivity
275
AnnSargent Wooster
280
Social Documentary as Personal Portraiture in Womens Video of the 1980s Christine Tamblyn
405
Telling Stories 421 Video Writing Raymond Bellour
421
An Anecdote Tony Labat
444
Approaching a Future Mythology Rita Myers
448
Light and Death Mary Lucier
457
The New Epistemic Space Woody Vasulka
465
Three Tapes by Steina Steina
471
Video BlackThe Mortality of the Image Bill Viola
477
Phototropic Tony Oursler
487
Notes
496
Contributors
521
Selected Bibliography
526
Videography and Video Index
547
Picture Credits
553
Index
557
Copyright

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About the author (1990)

Doug Hall is an artist who as been working in video and related media since 1970. His work has been shown at major museums in North America and Europe, and is included in public and private collections. He is chair of the department of performance/video at the San Francisco Art Institute, where he has been a faculty member since 1980.

Sally Jo Fifer has a Bachelor of Arts in art history from the University of California, Berkeley, and a Master's in communication from Stanford University. She is Executive Director of the Bay Area Video Coalition, a national arts/technology access and training center, helping artists produce programming ranging from video and installation art to performing-arts documentation.

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