Illustrated C# 2010

Front Cover
Apress, Dec 15, 2010 - Computers - 744 pages

This book presents the C# language in a uniquely succinct and visual format. Often in programming books, the information can be hidden in a vast sea of words. As a programmer who has over the years used a dozen programming languages, the author understands it can sometimes be difficult to slog through another 1,000-page book of dense text to learn a new language. There are likely many other programmers who feel the same way. To address this situation, this book explains C# using figures; short, focused code samples; and clear, concise explanations.

Figures are of prime importance in this book. While teaching programming seminars, Daniel Solis found that he could almost watch the lightbulbs going on over the students’ heads as he drew the figures on the whiteboard. In this text, he has distilled each important concept into simple but accurate illustrations. The visual presentation of the content will give you an understanding of C# that’s not possible with text alone.

For something as intricate and precise as a programming language, however, there must be text as well as figures. But rather than long, wordy explanations, Solis has used short, concise descriptions and bulleted lists to make each important piece of information visually distinct.

By the end of this book, you’ll have a thorough working knowledge of all aspects of the C# language, whether you’re a novice programmer or a seasoned veteran of other languages. If you want a long, leisurely, verbose explanation of the language, this is not the book for you. But if you want a concise, thorough, visual presentation of C#, this is just what you’re looking for.

What you’ll learn Details of the C# 2010 language presented in a clear, concise treatment New features in the latest version of .NET, in the author’s unique visual style How C# differs from and is similar to other programming languages, aiding migrating C++ and VB programmers who already know how languages work Who this book is for

Visual Basic programmers interested in moving to C# C++ programmers interested in moving to C# Novice programmers interested in learning C# Students in introductory programming classes learning C#

Table of Contents C# and the .NET Framework Overview of C# Programming Types, Storage and Variables Classes: The Basics Methods More about Classes Classes and Inheritance Expressions and Operators Statements Namespaces and Assemblies Exceptions Structs Enumerations Arrays Delegates Events Interfaces Conversions Generics Enumerators and Iterators Introduction to LINQ Introduction to Asynchronous Programming Preprocessor Directives Reflection and Attributes Other Topics
 

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Contents

C and the NET Framework
1
Overview of C Programming
15
Types Storage and Variables
31
The Basics
49
Methods
67
More About Classes
109
Classes and Inheritance
161
Expressions and Operators
201
Delegates
369
Events
391
Interfaces
409
Conversions
435
Generics
465
Enumerators and Iterators
505
Introduction to LINQ
537
Introduction to Asynchronous Programming
595

Statements
239
Namespaces and Assemblies
269
Exceptions
297
Structs
317
Enumerations
327
Arrays
341
Preprocessor Directives
627
Reflection and Attributes
639
Other Topics
663
Index
693
Copyright

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About the author (2010)

Daniel Solis is a contract software engineer who has worked for a number of high-profile clients, including Microsoft Consulting Services, IBM, Lockheed Martin, and PeopleSoft. He has been programming and teaching object-oriented languages and development methods throughout the U.S. and Europe since the early days of C++. It was while teaching numerous seminars on various programming languages that he realized the immense power of diagrams in explaining programming language concepts.

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