Image Duplicator: Roy Lichtenstein and the Emergence of Pop Art

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Yale University Press, Mar 11, 2002 - Art - 208 pages
Roy Lichtenstein's distinctive paintings of the early 1960s are synonymous with the Pop art movement. These bold, oversized images inspired by newspaper advertisements and comic book scenes have been taken as reflecting the artist's fascination with the links between art and popular culture. In this study, Michael Lobel challenges this circumscribed view of Lichtenstein's work, offering a set of interpretations that reveal the artist's confrontation with a far wider range of issues. Lichtenstein's art is fundamentally engaged with a set of concerns central to art-making in the postwar period: the relation between vision and technology, the possibility of articulating artistic identity, and the effect of mechanical reproduction on the work of art. Lichtenstein's project, Lobel argues, is structured by the tension between painting understood as a fully expressive, humanistic gesture and, conversely, as the product of a purely mechanical act.
 

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Image duplicator: Roy Lichtenstein and the emergence of pop art

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Among the many retrospective texts written in the years following Lichtenstein's death in 1997, this offers an unprecedented and cogent reappraisal of the artist's participation in the pop art ... Read full review

Contents

The Emergence of Pop Art
19
Trademark Lichtenstein
43
Technology Envisioned Lichtensteins Monocularity
79
The Image Duplicators
109
Engendering Difference
131
Conclusion
163
Notes
173
Bibliography
187
Index
193
Copyright

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Page 9 - Not satisfied with the suggestion through paint of our other senses, we shall utilize the specific substances of sight, sound, movements, people, odors, touch. Objects of every sort are materials for the new art: paint, chairs, food, electric and neon lights, smoke, water, old socks, a dog, movies, a thousand other things which will be discovered by the present generation of artists.
Page 9 - Objects of every sort are materials for the new art: paint, chairs, food, electric and neon lights, smoke, water, old socks, a dog, movies, a thousand other things which will be discovered by the present generation of artists. Not only will these bold creators show us, as if for the first time, the world we have always had about us, but ignored, but they will disclose entirely unheard of happenings and events, found in garbage cans, police files, hotel lobbies, seen in store windows and on the streets,...
Page 9 - I see him. left us at the point where we must become preoccupied with and even dazzled by the space and objects of our everyday life.

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