Images of the Human: The Philosophy of the Human Person in a Religious Context

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Loyola Press, 1995 - Philosophy - 633 pages
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Images of the human is the collective effort of thirteen philosophy professors to address the questions human beings have been asking for centuries. The book presents selections from the major works of eighteen of the best-known philosophers from ancient to modern times. Each chapter focuses on the writings of a different philosopher - from Plato to Nietzsche, Augustine to Sartre - and includes an introduction and critical comentary.
 

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Contents

Introduction
3
The Human Person
12
Commentary
29
The Human Person as a Besouled Body
49
Commentary
69
The Human Person
89
Commentary
107
The Human Person
119
Commentary
319
The Human Person
331
Commentary
351
The Human Person as Sexual
367
Commentary
385
Commentary
419
The Human Person
433
Commentary
457

Commentary
135
The Human Person as a Dualism
147
Commentary
167
The Human Person as a Construct
183
Commentary
203
The Human Person
213
Commentary
235
The Human Person as Worker
251
Commentary
277
The Human Person as Elusive
295
The Human Person as Necessitated
467
Commentary
489
The Human Person as Freedom
505
Commentary
523
The Human Person
535
Commentary
561
Miguel de Unamuno and Ernest Becker
577
Unamuno Selected Text
583
Commentary
597
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About the author (1995)

The American Pageant" has long enjoyed a reputation as one of the most accessible, popular, and effective textbooks in the field of American history. Its authors, Thomas A. Bailey and David M. Kennedy, now joined by Lizabeth Cohen, have sustained and enhanced the key features that strongly distinguish the "Pageant" from other American history textbooks and make it both appealing and useful to countless students: clarity, concreteness, a consistent chronological narrative, strong emphasis on major themes, avoidance of clutter, access to a variety of interpretive perspectives, and a colorful writing style leavened, as appropriate, with wit.

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