Imaginary Kings: Royal Images in the Ancient Near East, Greece and Rome

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Franz Steiner Verlag, 2005 - History - 231 pages
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This volume looks at various ways in which royal images functioned within different ideological frameworks in the ancient Near East, Greece and Rome. It argues that visibility lies at the heart of power, especially under monarchic rule. The contributions highlight how, throughout the ancient Mediterranean, patterns can be detected in the use of royal images. There seem to have been continuous (re)negotiations between innovation and tradition, East and West, and between aerealAe and aeimaginaryAe kings. Contents Richard Fowler / Olivier Hekster: Imagining kings: From Persia to Rome Lindsay Allen: Le roi imaginaire: An audience with the Achaemenid king Peter Thonemann: The tragic king: Demetrios Poliorketes and the city of Athens Margherita Facella: Roman perception of Commagenian royalty Matthew Gisborne: A curia of kings: Sulla and royal imagery Richard Fowler: aeMost fortunate rootsAe: Tradition and legitimacy in Parthian royal ideology Olivier Hekster: Captured in the gaze of power: Visibility, games and Roman imperial representation Ted Kaizer: Kingly priests in the Roman Near East? Bibliography Index
 

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Contents

Preface
7
An audience with the Achaemenid king
39
Demetrios Poliorketes and the city of Athens
63
Sulla and royal imagery
105
Kingly priests in the Roman Near East?
177
Abbreviations
193
Bibliography 95
213
List of figures
229
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