Imagination and Its Place in Education

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"Science embodies universal truths. Literature expresses truth as seen or exemplified by individuals. Neither literature nor the science of psychology alone can adequately deal with the subject of imagination. Psychology seeks to present what is true of all minds, but in no type of mental activity is there greater individuality than in the exercise of the imagination. Tests given students and their reports of introspective studies show that the same laws govern all minds. No topic reveals to students more clearly their mental processes and at the same time shows them that other persons arrive at the same results by different routes. This little book will introduce many to a study of the facts in the realm of imagination as exemplified in their own minds and in the minds of others, especially children, and as revealed in play, science, art, and literature."--Preface.
 

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Page 114 - ... plane, axle of toy cart, a bench, books, balls, and bric-a-brac. In reply to the supplementary questions, out of 579 children 57 had used a cat as a doll ; 41, clothespins ; 26, sticks ; 21, vegetables ; 20, a pillow. Only 26 of all these were boys. As an instance of flower dolls one correspondent writes : I often took pansies for dolls because of their human faces ; the rose I revered too much to play with, it was like my best wax doll, dressed in her prettiest, but always sitting in state in...
Page 99 - He learns something of the laws of the world in which he lives, and which he cannot change, in contrast with the imaginary kingdom over which he has almost complete control.
Page 20 - ... roads, or their hydro-electric systems without some measure of Government assistance. Soil conservation, flood control, reafforestation, irrigation, geological surveys, rural electrification — these are spheres of activity that have been commonly associated with public enterprise in recent times. There are several reasons why this should be so. In the first place, they often require more capital than even giant private corporations can raise conveniently and 1 Speaking of Great Britain, for...
Page 126 - On the other hand, one who is overworked and has no energy left for new interests may lack the opportunity for that imaginative picturing of what may be done and gained which is the chief stimulus to ambition. Fortunate is the youth who has plenty of work and something to be interested in every day of the week, but who has some leisure in which to do as he likes, and indulge...
Page 115 - ... The pansy was a willing, quick, bright flower child, the rose her grown-up sister, pretty, always charmingly dressed, but a quiet and sedate spectator. Violets were shy, good-natured children, but their pansy cousins were often naughty and would not play. The hepaticas were invalids and cripples who watched their livelier brothers and sisters and were entertained by stiff maiden aunts, marigolds, with long curls. The dahlias were colored servants and mammies ; yellow violets were mischievous,...
Page 100 - The period from three to six is preeminently the time in which free play of the imagination is contrasted with fixed sensory experiences of the immediate environment. From six to twelve the imagination is occupied with constructing the distant world of reality and perhaps reveling in a fairyland where wishes and fancy play a large part. From twelve to maturity is the period of adventure, romance, and idealism in which the real world is the theater of the imagination, but the desirable is selected...
Page 172 - ... by the preceding one, and the child reached the end of the sentence with nothing in mind but the last word. It was not until they had read in this way many hundred times, and had learned, by dint of going over them again and again, to know the commoner words as wholes, that the children really began to read in the sense of getting thought from the printed page. And, even then, they read slowly and imperfectly, for before reaching that point they had formed a habit of reading mechanically, and...
Page 99 - Interest is then usually centered for several years upon history and geography, and the child learns much regarding the different parts of the earth and the succession of events leading to present-day civilization. The wish and the play elements at this time demand stories of adventure which depict a more rapid succession of exciting incidents than is supplied by daily life or ordinary geography and history study.

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