Imaginative Qualities of Actual Things

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Dalkey Archive Press, 1971 - Fiction - 243 pages
5 Reviews

Wildly comic and bitterly satiric, Imaginative Qualities of Actual Things is Gilbert Sorrentino's ruthless, and timeless, attack on the New York art world of the 1950s and '60s. Among the best of Sorrentino's novels, Imaginative Qualities is also, quite simply, the best American novel ever written about writers and artists.

 

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LibraryThing Review

User Review  - flydodofly - LibraryThing

unbelievable writing talent, lavishly displayed. not an emotion revealed, but intellectually gripping and taking you this way and that, suddenly turning around to show yet another possibility. the master of what ifs, without a why. because he could. Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - giovannigf - LibraryThing

Hilarious and searing satire of New York's literary world in the 50s and 60s. Beautifully written, the only drawback being a streak of misogyny that I'm blaming on the time it was written. Read full review

Contents

I
1
III
25
IV
55
V
87
VII
109
VIII
153
X
183
XI
213
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About the author (1971)

Gilbert Sorrentino (1929--2006) is the most influential American novelist of the past forty years, and his work represents American fiction at its best and most daring. He was an editor for the literary magazines Neon and Kulcher, and later at Grove Press in the 1960s. He taught at Stanford University from 1982 to 1999. His novels include The Sky Changes, Steelwork, Aberration of Starlight, Mulligan Stew, and The Abyss of Human Illusion.

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