Imagining Winter

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Interactive Publications, 2006 - Poetry - 84 pages
1 Review
Winner, IP Picks 2006 Best Poetry Award. Harsh. Cutting. Uncomfortably touching. This poetry collection delves into the darkness of the modern world. Dawson's work has tremendous scope and agility. In the title poem, in a single breath he ranges from the Renaissance to postmodern sunsets in trying to imagine a metaphor for winter: Shall I compare thee to a summer's day? Stars squint and yawn, unfolding, the moon bleeds dry Why try to describe it? Whether addressing issues such as racism, homophobia and terrorism, or turning a wickedly scathing eye on the failings of writers and other misfits, Paul Dawson's poems are angry and unforgettable. He explores the bleakness of city landscapes, seeks meaning in the heat of eroticism, and lays bare the things people will not admit to thinking, even to themselves.
 

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Contents

II
3
III
4
IV
9
V
10
VI
12
VII
14
VIII
18
IX
19
XV
40
XVI
47
XVII
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XVIII
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XIX
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XX
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XXI
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XXII
60

X
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XI
25
XII
27
XIII
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XIV
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XXIII
61
XXIV
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XXV
76
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About the author (2006)

Paul Dawson was born in Sydney in 1972 and has been writing poetry for the last fifteen years. This is his first collection. Paul¿s poetry and fiction have previously been published in a range of literary journals and newspapers, including Slope (US), Southerly, Blue Dog: Australian Poetry, Meanjin, Island, Imago: New Writing, and The Sydney Morning Herald. He is also the author of Creative Writing and the New Humanities (London/New York: Routledge, 2005). Paul has worked as an actor, director and writer in community and co-operative theatre, appearing in the Australian premiere of Fresh Off the Boat by David Henry Hwang as part of the 1995 Asian Theatre Festival at Belvoir Street Theatre. Paul then moved into academe and has a Master of Arts in Creative Writing from the University of Queensland, and a PhD in English from the University of Melbourne. He is now a Senior Lecturer in the School of English at the University of New South Wales, where he teaches Creative Writing and literary studies.

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