Immigrants in Prairie Cities: Ethnic Diversity in Twentieth-century Canada

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University of Toronto Press, 2009 - History - 257 pages
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Over the course of the twentieth century, sequential waves of immigrants from Europe, Asia, Latin America, and Africa settled in the cities of the Canadian Prairies. In Immigrants in Prairie Cities, Royden Loewen and Gerald Friesen analyze the processes of cultural interaction and adaptation that unfolded in these urban centres and describe how this model of diversity has changed over time. The authors argue that intimate Prairie cities fostered a form of social diversity characterized by vibrant ethnic networks, continuously evolving ethnic identities, and boundary zones that facilitated intercultural contact and hybridity.

Impressive in scope, Immigrants in Prairie Cities spans the entire twentieth century, and encompasses personal testimonies, government perspectives, and even fictional narratives. This engaging work will appeal to both historians of the Canadian Prairies and those with a general interest in migration, cross-cultural exchange, and urban history.

 

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Contents

Family Religion and Fraternity
13
Patterns of Conflict and Adjustment in Winnipeg
35
Ethnic CrossCurrents in MidCentury Alberta and Saskatchewan
57
Accommodation in Winnipeg
77
The Global South in Calgary and Edmonton
101
Gender and Family in Hybrid Households
121
Racism AntiRacism and Race in Winnipeg
139
Prairie Links in a Transnational Chain
157
Conclusion
175
bibliography
223
index
247
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About the author (2009)

Royden Loewen is the Chair in Mennonite Studies and  a professor in the Department of History at the University of Winnipeg. He is an award-winning author of a number of books on Mennonites and immigrants in North America.

Gerald Friesen is Distinguished Professor Emeritus in the Department of History at the University of Manitoba.

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