Immunity-Based Systems: A Design Perspective

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Springer Science & Business Media, Apr 5, 2004 - Computers - 177 pages
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After I came to know Jerne's network theory on the immune system, I became fascinated with the immune system as an information system. The main pro totypes for biological information systems have been the neural systems and the brain. However, the immune system is not only an interesting informa tion system but it may provide a design paradigm for artificial information systems. With such a consideration, I initiated a project titled "autonomous decentralized recognition mechanism of the immune network and its applica tion to distributed information processing" in 1990 under a Grant-in-Aid for Scientific Research on a Priority Area ("Autonomous Distributed Systems") supported by the Ministry of Education, Science, and Culture. During the project, I promoted the idea that the immune system could be a prototype of autonomous distributed systems. After the project, we organized an international workshop on immunity based systems in 1996 in conjunction with the International Conference on Multi-Agent Systems held in Kyoto, Japan. Recently, there have been several international conferences related to topics inspired by the immune system and an increasing number of research papers related to the topic. In writing this book, a decade after the project, I still believe that the immune system can be a prototype, a compact but sophisticated system that nature has shown us for building artificial information systems in this network age of the twenty-first century.
 

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Contents

Introduction
1
13 Background
3
14 Structure of the Following Chapters
4
Toward a Systems Science for Biological Systems
7
22 Viewpoint for Biological Systems
11
222 Emergence of Hierarchy in Complex Systems
13
223 Emergent Causality and Network
15
224 SelfReference
16
55 SelfOrganization in the Model
87
551 Evaluation Among Agents
88
56 Restructuring of the Network
89
57 Related Works and Discussions
93
58 Summary and Conclusion
94
Sensor Networks Using the SelfOrganizing Network
95
62 SelfNonself Counterparts in the Sensor Network
96
63 Agents on the Sensor Network
97

225 Additive Systems
17
23 Using Analogy and Metaphor
18
231 Analogy and AI
20
232 Analogy and Systems Science
21
233 Analogy and the Immune System
22
242 Artificial Life
24
25 Frame of Reference for Biological Systems
25
The Immune System as an Information System
27
an Overview of the Immune System
28
321 Categorization of the Immune System
29
322 Players and Stage of the Immune System
33
323 Specificity in Recognition
34
324 Diversity Generation Mechanism
38
325 The Immune System and Information Processing
39
33 The Immune System as a Network
40
331 Network Theory of Jerne
41
332 Linguistics by Generative Grammar Metaphor
44
34 The Immune System as an Adaptive System
45
343 Different Modes of Information Transfer
47
352 Organismic View of Metchinikoff
49
36 Phylogenic Approach to the Immune System
50
362 Symbiotic Relation to Multicellular Organisms
51
37 The Immune System and Other Biological Systems
52
372 Other Biological Defense Systems
54
Defining ImmunityBased Systems
55
42 Concept of ImmunityBased Systems
56
43 SelfMaintenance System
58
431 Autopoietic Systems
59
441 Agent as Primitive
60
442 The Immune System as a Dynamic Network
61
45 Adaptive Systems
62
46 Implications for Design
63
461 Leaving Some Design Specification to the Environment
65
462 Analogy with the Self and Nonself
66
47 Designing the ImmunityBased System
67
471 Models for IMBS
68
472 Specifications for IMBS
69
48 Related Works and Discussions
71
49 Summary and Conclusion
74
A SelfOrganizing Network Based on the Concept of the Immune Network
77
52 Concept of a Network Model
78
a Network View
80
523 The SelfReferential Character
83
54 Distributed Processing in the Network
85
64 Dynamic Interaction Among Agents
98
65 Extension of the Sensor Network
100
652 Process Diagnosis by Evaluating Consistency Among Data from Sensors
102
66 Related Works and Discussions
105
67 Summary and Conclusion
106
A Multiagent Framework Learned from the Immune System
107
72 Concepts
108
a Selection View
109
723 Information Framework for Specification of Agents
111
73 An AgentBased Framework
113
74 An Immune Algorithm
114
75 Implementation of the Immune Algorithm
117
76 Domains for the Immune Algorithm
118
77 Related Works and Discussions
119
78 Summary and Conclusion
120
An Application of the Immune Algorithm with an Agent Framework
121
82 SelfNonself Counterparts in Noise Neutralization
122
83 Application of the Immune Algorithm to Adaptive Noise Neutralization
123
84 Adaptive Noise Neutralization by the Immune Algorithm
127
841 Simulation and Performance of the Noise Neutralizer
128
842 A New Initial Set of Gene Data
130
843 Filtering SelfReactive Agents
133
85 Related Works and Discussions
134
86 Summary and Conclusion
135
Information Flow Biological Field and Autonomous Distributed Systems
139
921 SelfOrganization in Autonomous Distributed Systems
141
93 InformationFlow Characteristics of Autonomous Distributed Systems
143
931 Designing Autonomous Distributed Systems
147
932 The Immune System as a Prototype of Autonomous Distributed Systems
148
933 The Immune System as a SelfDefining Process
149
The Immune System as a SelfDefining Process
151
102 Specification of ImmunityBased Systems Based on SelfNonself Discrimination
152
1022 From the Viewpoint of Fault Diagnosis
153
1023 A Design of Agents
154
103 Toward the ImmunityBased Systems Induced from the SelfDefining Process
155
1032 Toward a System Theory of SelfDefining Processes
156
1033 Fusion and Rejection in Mutually Supporting Collectives
158
1034 The SelfDefining Process in the Computer Network
161
1035 SelfDefinition in the Immune System and Consciousness
162
104 Summary and Conclusion
163
Conclusions
165
References
167
Index
175
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