Imperial Women: A Study in Public Images, 40 B.c. - A.d. 68

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BRILL, Jan 1, 2000 - Art - 490 pages
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From the end of the Roman Republic to the death of the last Julio-Claudian emperor, portraits of women - on coins, public monuments, and private luxury objects - became an increasingly familiar sight throughout the empire. These women usually represented the distinguished bloodlines of the head of the state, or his hopes for succession, but in every case, their images were freighted with political significance. These objects also communicated social messages about the appropriate roles, behavior, and self-presentation of women. This volume traces the emergence and development of the public female portrait, from Octavia, the first Roman woman to be represented "in propria persona" on coinage, to the formidable and ambitious Agrippina the Younger, whose assassination demonstrated to later women the limits of official power they could demand.
 

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Contents

Octavia Minor and Julia F Augusti
27
Livia
75
Antonia Minor
142
Vipsania Agrippina and Livilla I the Women
177
Agrippina I and her Daughters the Family
203
Messalina Agrippina II Claudia Octavia
249
Conclusions
315
Abbreviations
331
Index
347
List of Illustrations and Photo Credits
362
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About the author (2000)

Susan E. Wood, Ph.D. (1979) in Art History and Archaeology, Columbia University, is a Professor of Art History at Oakland University. She has published extensively on Roman portraiture and funerary monuments.