Imperialism, Sovereignty and the Making of International Law

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Cambridge University Press, Apr 26, 2007 - Law - 356 pages
1 Review
This book argues that the colonial confrontation was central to the formation of international law and, in particular, its founding concept, sovereignty. Traditional histories of the discipline present colonialism and non-European peoples as peripheral concerns. By contrast, Anghie argues that international law has always been animated by the 'civilizing mission' - the project of governing non-European peoples, and that the economic exploitation and cultural subordination that resulted were constitutively significant for the discipline. In developing these arguments, the book examines different phases of the colonial encounter, ranging from the sixteenth century to the League of Nations period and the current 'war on terror'. Anghie provides a new approach to the history of international law, illuminating the enduring imperial character of the discipline and its continuing importance for peoples of the Third World. This book will be of interest to students of international law and relations, history, post-colonial studies and development studies.
 

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Contents

VI
13
VIII
17
IX
23
X
28
XI
32
XIII
40
XIV
52
XV
65
XXXI
211
XXXII
216
XXXIII
220
XXXIV
223
XXXV
226
XXXVI
235
XXXVII
245
XXXVIII
247

XVI
100
XVII
115
XIX
119
XX
123
XXI
136
XXII
147
XXIII
156
XXIV
179
XXV
190
XXVI
194
XXVII
196
XXVIII
199
XXIX
204
XXX
207
XXXIX
254
XL
258
XLI
263
XLII
268
XLIII
273
XLV
274
XLVI
279
XLVII
291
XLVIII
298
XLIX
303
L
310
LI
321
LII
342
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About the author (2007)

Professor of Law at the S. J. Quinney School of Law, University of Utah.

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