Implementing Codes of Conduct: How Businesses Manage Social Performance in Global Supply Chains

Front Cover
International Labour Organization, 2004 - Business & Economics - 429 pages
0 Reviews

Based on interviews with hundreds of managers, activists, government officials, factory workers, and workers' representatives, Implementing Codes of Conduct represents the most extensive research conducted to date into the emerging nature of corporate social responsibility and global supply chains. Its objective is to provide useful examples and lessons learned to companies, policymakers, and others who are interested in implementing their own code of conduct or are actively involved in this field.This book has broad implications for firms that are serious about seeing the social and environmental objectives expressed in their corporate codes become a reality at the supplier level ?implications that stretch from the boardroom to the factory floor. The book maps a route from the creation of a vision to its implementation at the operational level. Based on research conducted in the sports footwear, apparel, and retail sectors, this book provides a detailed account of the approaches currently used by leading brands and retailers, with practical suggestions for other companies to follow in addressing social pressures. Given an increasingly clear link between corporate social responsibility and profits, this book is an invaluable tool in assisting those interested in balancing the complex demands of society and competitive concerns.

 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

List of figures and tables
8
Foreword
10
Chapter I
12
Purpose and impact
13
Scope of research
14
Methodology
15
Chapter V
18
A note on the presentation of datatranscriptions
20
Creating a shared vision
85
Developing understanding and ability
92
Implementing the code in operations
105
Example structure of FMNE
106
Example structure of FMNE supplier with MNE representation on site
108
Example structure of FMNE supplier
110
Feedback improvement and remediation
121
Interrelation integration and dialogue
132

Acknowledgements
21
Chapter n Review of the environment and content of codes
23
Figures Figure 1 Global inflows of FDI19702002 by group of countries
24
Emergence of corporate initiatives
25
Distinguishing features of codes
35
Language used in a code
39
Types of code of conduct
43
Selection of code content
45
Specific standards
48
Implementing guidelines
54
Regulatory conflicts
56
Assuring compliance
57
Internal and external reporting mechanisms
58
Multistakeholder initiatives MSIs
60
Challenges facing MSIs
64
Chapter m
66
Supply chain network
68
Report framework
70
Chapter IV
74
where does compliance fit?
76
Review of the footwear sector
78
sports footwear in southern China
81
Review of the apparel sector
149
example
150
Total US imports of textiles and apparel 19902002
151
Apparel supply chain
152
Garment manufacturing process infactory
153
CSR teambased structure AMNE 2
177
Organisational structure AMNE 2 with small supplier base
178
apparel MNE
179
Perceived level of corruption in selected apparelmanufacturing countries and apparel MNE home countries
186
Code implementation management teams
226
Chapter VI
227
order fluctuation amplification in supply chains
235
Example of the organisational structure of an RMNE
263
Example of the organisational structure of a retail supplier
265
Phased approach to implementation based on sharing good practices
269
Chapter
305
Summary and conclusions
337
Glossary
360
Experts comments on the interview schedule suggested additional
387
Bibliography
411
Copyright

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

References to this book

All Book Search results »

About the author (2004)

Ivanka Mamic is a research officer at ILO.

Bibliographic information