Imposing Their Will: An Organizational History of Jewish Toronto, 1933-1948

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McGill-Queen's Press - MQUP, Jun 15, 2011 - History - 384 pages
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Showing how issues such as immigration restrictions, poverty, anti-Semitism, and the Holocaust contributed to cooperation between institutions and individuals, Jack Lipinsky provides compelling insights into the formation of one of the world's great Jewish communities. He studies the re-emergence of the Canadian Jewish Congress, the establishment of the Toronto Free Hebrew School, the rise of professionalism in the various philanthropic organisations, and traces the community's shift away from the influence of Montreal. An illuminating look at the growth and strength of a community, Imposing Their Will provides valuable new ways to understand Canadian Jewry, the diaspora, ethnic governance, and the development of Canadian multiculturalism.
 

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Contents

Toronto Jewry before 1933
3
1933
33
Professionalization from Within until 1934
59
Long Distance Professionalization to 1937
79
The Canadian Jewish Congress in Toronto 193437
109
The Toronto Hebrew Free School and the Rise of the United Jewish Welfare Fund 193339
153
7 Institutional and Communal Consolidation 193843
177
8 O Brave New World? The Imposition of Will 194348
209
Entering the Mainstream
269
Glossary of Individuals
285
Notes
289
Bibliography
337
Index
349
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About the author (2011)

Jack Lipinsky holds a PhD in history from the University of Toronto, lectures in its School of Continuing Studies, teaches at Robbins Hebrew Academy, and is the spiritual coordinator of the Stashow-Slipi Congregation.

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