Imprecise and Approximate Computation

Front Cover
Swaminathan Natarajan
Springer Science & Business Media, Jun 30, 1995 - Computers - 178 pages
Real-time systems are now used in a wide variety of applications. Conventionally, they were configured at design to perform a given set of tasks and could not readily adapt to dynamic situations. The concept of imprecise and approximate computation has emerged as a promising approach to providing scheduling flexibility and enhanced dependability in dynamic real-time systems.
The concept can be utilized in a wide variety of applications, including signal processing, machine vision, databases, networking, etc. For those who wish to build dynamic real-time systems which must deal safely with resource unavailability while continuing to operate, leading to situations where computations may not be carried through to completion, the techniques of imprecise and approximate computation facilitate the generation of partial results that may enable the system to operate safely and avert catastrophe.
Audience: Of special interest to researchers. May be used as a supplementary text in courses on real-time systems.
 

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Contents

Chapter
1
_ System Structure ODOb0O 2 Stages of Task Existence Within the System
4
Example of Imprecise Computation Prediction for N
8
NGp Algorithm 5 NGM Algorithm 6 NG1 Algorithm
9
NGH Algorithm
10
General Transitional Notice Generator
11
NGM to NGp Switching Algorithm
12
NG1 to NGp Switching Algorithm 14 NGH to NGP Switching Algorithm 15 Mean Waiting Time
13
APPROXIMATE REASONING USING
43
Chapter 4
44
Chapter 5
58
Chapter 2
60
INTEGRATING UNBOUNDED SOFTWARE
63
An example relationship between 1 r and T
70
REPLICATED IMPRECISE COMPUTATIONS
87
Chapter 6
88

Mean Computation Time
14
Mean Time Without Notice
19
Chapter 7
22
REPRESENTING AND SCHEDULING
23
Chapter 2
24
Two examples of iterative refinement task groups The solid lines indicate a tasksubtask relationship The dashed lines indicate a precedence constraint
27
An example of a multiple method task group The solid lines indicate tasksubtask relationships
28
A SURVEY OF SCHEDULING RESULTS
35
Chapter 3
36
Upper bound utilizations given by the greedy algorithm
104
PRODUCING MONOTONICALLY IMPROVING
117
Chapter 7
118
Chapter 9
132
APPROXIMATE UPDATE OF LOGICAL
135
A DECISIONTHEORETIC TREATMENT
149
INDEX
175
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