Imprisoned in a Luminous Glare: Photography and the African American Freedom Struggle

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UNC Press Books, Feb 10, 2011 - Social Science - 312 pages
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In Imprisoned in a Luminous Glare, Leigh Raiford argues that over the past one hundred years activists in the black freedom struggle have used photographic imagery both to gain political recognition and to develop a different visual vocabulary about black lives. Raiford analyzes why activists chose photography over other media, explores the doubts some individuals had about the strategies, and shows how photography became an increasingly effective, if complex, tool in representing black political interests.

Offering readings of the use of photography in the antilynching movement, the civil rights movement, and the black power movement, Raiford focuses on key transformations in technology, society, and politics to understand the evolution of photography's deployment in capturing white oppression, black resistance, and African American life. By putting photography at the center of the long African American freedom struggle, Raiford also explores how the recirculation of these indelible images in political campaigns and art exhibits both adds to and complicates our memory of the events.

 

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Contents

Introduction
1
1 No Relation to the Facts about Lynching
29
2 Come Let Us Build a New World Together
67
3 Attacked First by Sight
129
Or Was It the Pictures That Made Her Unrecognizable?
209
Notes
239
Bibliography
261
Index
283
Copyright

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About the author (2011)

Leigh Raiford is assistant professor of African American studies at the University of California, Berkeley.

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