In Another Country: Colonialism, Culture, and the English Novel in India

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Columbia University Press, Jan 22, 2005 - Literary Criticism - 368 pages
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In a work of stunning archival recovery and interpretive virtuosity, Priya Joshi illuminates the cultural work performed by two kinds of English novels in India during the colonial and postcolonial periods. Spanning the nineteenth and twentieth centuries, readers and writers, empire and nation, consumption and production, In Another Country vividly explores a process by which first readers and then writers of the English novel indigenized the once imperial form and put it to their own uses. Asking what nineteenth-century Indian readers chose to read and why, Joshi shows how these readers transformed the literary and cultural influences of empire. By subsequently analyzing the eventual rise of the English novel in India, she further demonstrates how Indian novelists, from Krupa Satthianadhan to Salman Rushdie, took an alien form in an alien language and used it to address local needs. Taken together in this manner, reading and writing reveal the complex ways in which culture is continually translated and transformed in a colonial and postcolonial context.
 

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Contents

1 The Poetical Economy of Consumption
3
2 The Circulation of Fiction in Indian Libraries ca 18351901
35
THe Macmillan Colonial Library in India
93
Consuming Fiction
139
Bankims Will or Indigenizing the Novel in India
141
Krupa Satthianadhan the Woman Who Did
172
Ahmed Alis Twilight in Delhi
205
7 The Other Modernism or The Family Romance in English
228
Notes
263
Bibliography
301
Index
347
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About the author (2005)

Priya Joshi is assistant professor in the Department of English at the University of California at Berkeley.


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