In Memoriam

Front Cover
Cambridge University Press, Feb 14, 2013 - History - 224 pages
0 Reviews
'Next to the Bible, In Memoriam is my comfort.' Queen Victoria's reliance, after the death of Prince Albert, on this poem by Alfred Tennyson (1809-92), Poet Laureate from 1850, epitomises its place at the heart of Victorian public and private life. The most famous poem of its age and an instant bestseller, In Memoriam was an elegy for Arthur Henry Hallam, Tennyson's closest friend, who had died young in Vienna in 1833. Its distinctive iambic tetrameter stanzas - begun days after the news reached Tennyson, and reworked for the next seventeen years - explore the nature of grief, religious consolation, and profound anxieties about man's relationship with nature, articulating the quintessential Victorian emotions of mourning and troubled faith. This reissue is of the third edition, published in 1850, the same year as the first.
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Selected pages

Contents

Section 1
i
Section 2
ii
Section 3
iv
Section 4
v
Section 5
vi
Section 6
9
Section 7
24
Section 8
37
Section 9
161
Copyright

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

About the author (2013)

Alfred Tennyson was born on August 6, 1809 in Somersby, England. He attended Trinity College in Cambridge. Tennyson is chiefly known for his poetry, an art form that had interested him since the age of six. His best known work is the Idylls of the King. Tennyson was appointed Poet Laureate of England in 1850 and became the Baron of Aldworth and Farrington in 1883. Tennyson was still writing his his 80s, and died on October 6, 1892 near Haslemere, England.