In Pursuit of the Traveling Salesman: Mathematics at the Limits of Computation

Front Cover
Princeton University Press, 2012 - Mathematics - 228 pages
0 Reviews

"A gripping insider's account of one of the great mathematical problems. This book shows how deep mathematical insights can arise from apparently simple questions, and how the results can be applied to that most human of objectives: to achieve a desired outcome in the best possible way. In Pursuit of the Traveling Salesman deserves to become an instant classic."--Ian Stewart, author of Professor Stewart's Hoard of Mathematical Treasures

"I found this to be a wonderful book on many levels. The writing is informal but precise, and a lot of ground is covered. Cook ties together so many diverse topics and includes informative discussions about the history. I now know a lot more about every aspect of the traveling salesman problem."--Stan Wagon, Macalester College, author of Mathematica in Action

"Cook makes a compelling case for the importance of the traveling salesman problem, revealing that while many brilliant minds have worked on the problem, the next key insight could really come from anyone. Because of his centrality to the research, he writes with a depth of knowledge and experience that few--if any--can surpass. I know of no other book like this."--Mitchel T. Keller, London School of Economics and Political Science

 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

1 Challenges
1
2 Origins of the Problem
19
3 The Salesman in Action
44
4 Searching for a Tour
62
5 Linear Programming
94
6 Cutting Planes
127
7 Branching
146
8 Big Computing
153
9 Complexity
168
10 The Human Touch
191
11 Aesthetics
199
12 Pushing the Limits
211
Notes
213
Bibliography
223
Index
225
Copyright

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

About the author (2012)

William J. Cook is professor of combinatorics and optimization at the University of Waterloo. He is the coauthor of The Traveling Salesman Problem: A Computational Study (Princeton).

Bibliographic information