In memoriam [by A. Tennyson].

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1885
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Page 82 - Thou makest thine appeal to me: I bring to life, I bring to death; The spirit does but mean the breath: I know no more.
Page 4 - I HELD it truth, with him who sings To one clear harp in divers tones, That men may rise on stepping-stones Of their dead selves to higher things.
Page 145 - Perplext in faith, but pure in deeds, At last he beat his music out. There lives more faith in honest doubt, Believe me, than in half the creeds.
Page 78 - Oh yet we trust that somehow good Will be the final goal of ill, To pangs of nature, sins of will, Defects of doubt, and taints of blood ; That nothing walks with aimless feet ; That not one life shall be destroyed, Or cast as rubbish to the void, When God hath made the pile complete...
Page 71 - THAT each, who seems a separate whole, Should move his rounds, and fusing all The skirts of self again, should fall Remerging in the general Soul, Is faith as vague as all unsweet : Eternal form shall still divide The eternal soul from all beside ; And I shall know him when we meet...
Page 2 - Our little systems have their day; They have their day and cease to be; They are but broken lights of thee, And thou, O Lord, art more than they.
Page 69 - THE baby new to earth and sky, What time his tender palm is prest Against the circle of the breast, Has never thought that ' this is I : ' But as he grows he gathers much, And learns the use of ' I,' and ' me,' And finds ' I am not what I see, And other than the things I touch.
Page 144 - The dawn, the dawn," and died away ; And East and West, without a breath, Mixt their dim lights, like life and death, To broaden into boundless day.
Page 80 - THE wish, that of the living whole No life may fail beyond the grave, Derives it not from what we have The likest God within the soul...
Page 104 - As sometimes in a dead man's face, To those that watch it more and more, A likeness, hardly seen before, Comes out — to some one of his race : So, dearest, now thy brows are cold, I see thee what thou art, and know Thy likeness to the wise below, Thy .kindred with the great of old.

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