In Sickness and in Health: A Manual of Domestic Medicine and Surgery, Hygiene, Dietetics, and Nursing

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D. Appleton, 1896 - Medicine, Popular - 991 pages
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Page 295 - EXERCISE, place the hands on the hips, as in Fourth Exercise. FORWARD: Move the left leg to the front, knee straight, so as to advance the foot about fifteen inches, toe turned out, sole nearly horizontal, body balanced on right foot. REAR: Move the leg to the rear, knee straight, toe on a line with the right heel, sole nearly horizontal. Continue by repeating FORWARD, REAR. When the recruit has learned to balance himself, the command FORWARD is followed by GROUND : Throw the weight of the body forward...
Page 294 - Left (Right), 4. FORWARD, 5. REAR; or, 5. GROUND. At the command exercise, place the hands on the hips, as in Fourth Exercise. FORWARD: Move the left leg to the front, knee straight, so as to advance the foot about fifteen inches, toe turned out, sole nearly horizontal, body balanced on right foot.
Page 293 - ... full length, thumbs pointing to the rear, elbows pressed back. UP: Extend the arms upward their full length, palms touching. Down: Force the arms obliquely back and gradually let them fall by the sides. RAISE: Raise the arms laterally as prescribed for the second command. Continue by repeating head up, down, raise. SECOND EXERCISE.
Page 293 - Swing the extended arms horizontally to the front, palms touching. REAR: Swing the extended arms well to the rear, inclining them slightly downward, raising the body upon the toes. Continue by repeating front, rear, till the men, if possible, are able to touch...
Page 147 - Now it is not too much to say that if an optician wanted, to sell me an instrument which had all these defects, I should think myself quite justified in blaming his carelessness in the strongest terms, and giving him back his instrument.
Page 190 - What, in any situation, we are restrained from doing is as important to us as what we do. Tension, the mutual opposition and balancing of numerous tendencies, is absolutely essential to normal life. The brain receives, at every waking instant, an enormous overwealth of sensory stimulation.
Page 295 - UP: Raise the left leg to the front, bending and elevating the knee as much as possible, leg from knee to instep vertical, toe depressed. UP: Replace the left foot and raise the right leg as prescribed for the left. Execute slowly at first, then gradually increase to the cadence of double time. Continue by repeating up when the right and left legs are alternately in position. Fifth exercise.
Page 193 - Thou shalt love," etc., for the "Thou shalt not" of the Ten Commandments. A brain that is devoted to mere inhibition becomes, in very truth, like the brain of a Hindoo ascetic — a mere " parasite " of the organism, feeding, as it were, upon all the lower inherited or acquired nervous functions of this organism by devoting itself to their hindrance. In persons of morbidly conscientious life such inhibitory phenomena may easily get an inconvenient, and sometimes do get a dangerous intensity. The...
Page 336 - ... by worms. It is a marvellous reflection that the whole of the superficial mould over any such expanse has passed, and will again pass, every few years through the bodies of worms.
Page 292 - First exercise. 1. Arm, 2. EXERCISE, 3. HEAD, 4. UP, 5. DOWN, 6. RAISE. At the command exercise, raise the arms laterally until horizontal, palms upward. HEAD: Raise the arms in a circular direction over the head, tips of fingers touching top of the head, backs of fingers in contact their full length, thumbs pointing to the rear, elbows pressed back.

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