In the Aftermath of Catastrophe: Founding Judaism 70-640

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McGill-Queen's Press - MQUP, Apr 1, 2009 - History - 192 pages
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Neusner argues that the Judaism that emerged in late antiquity experimented with solutions to a critical and enduring issue of culture that continues to engage humanity - the crisis provoked by calamity. Exemplified in our time by the German war against the Jews from 1933-1945, in antiquity calamity took the form of the destruction in 70 C.E. of the Temple of Jerusalem and the cessation of its sacrifices, putting an end to the cultic calendar by which people had measured the passage of time in the heavens and maintained their relationship with God on earth. Resolution of this crisis required a radical solution, the reversion to prophecy, which had as a consequence restoration of world order Judaism as we know it responded then and continues to respond now to the paramount problem of that day and ours - the end of the old order and the advent of the new.
 

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Contents

Introduction
3
THE HALAKHIC AND AGGADIC REPONSES TO THE HURBAN
21
THE PROPHETIC SOURCES OF RABBINIC JUDAISM
117
Afterword
201
Notes
203
Index
209
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About the author (2009)

Jacob Neusner is Distinguished Service Professor of the History and Theology of Judaism and Senior Fellow, Institute of Advanced Theology, Bard College.

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