In the Almost Promised Land: American Jews and Blacks, 1915-1935

Front Cover
JHU Press, Oct 1, 1995 - Biography & Autobiography - 271 pages
0 Reviews
Seeking the reasons behind Jewish altruism toward African-Americans, Hasia Diner shows how - in the wake of the Leo Frank trial and lynching in Atlanta - Jews came to see that their relative prosperity was no protection against the same social forces that threatened blacks. It thus became in the Jewish American self-interest to support the black struggle for racial justice and to fight against American prejudice. Jewish leaders and organisations genuinely believed in the cause of black civil rights, Diner suggests, but they also used that cause as a way of advancing their own interests without seeming pushy or too demanding - launching a vicarious attack on the nation that they felt had not lived up to its own pronouncements of freedom and equality.
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

Images of Blacks
28
English
89
Jews in the Black
118
Jews and Black
164
Jewish Labor
199
for Identity
236
Section
281
A Introduction
365
List of Principal Works
373
List of Statutory Material
379
B Monetary Enforcement
383
Copyright

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 381 - An Act for the Abolition of Imprisonment for Debt, for the punishment of fraudulent debtors, and for other purposes.

References to this book

All Book Search results »

About the author (1995)

Hasia Diner is professor of American Studies at the University of Maryland, College Park. She is the author of Erin's Daughters in America and A Time for Gathering: The Second Migration, 1820-1880 (Volume II in the series The Jewish People in America), both available from Johns Hopkins.

Bibliographic information