In the Freud Archives

Front Cover
New York Review of Books, 2002 - Fiction - 162 pages
3 Reviews
Includes an afterword by the author

In the Freud Archives tells the story of an unlikely encounter among three men: K. R. Eissler, the venerable doyen of psychoanalysis; Jeffrey Moussaieff Masson, a flamboyant, restless forty-two-year-old Sanskrit scholar turned psychoanalyst turned virulent anti-Freudian; and Peter Swales, a mischievous thirty-five-year-old former assistant to the Rolling Stones and self-taught Freud scholar. At the center of their Oedipal drama are the Sigmund Freud Archives--founded, headed, and jealously guarded by Eissler--whose sealed treasure gleams and beckons to the community of Freud scholarship as if it were the Rhine gold.

Janet Malcolm's fascinating book first appeared some twenty years ago, when it was immediately recognized as a rare and remarkable work of nonfiction. A story of infatuation and disappointment, betrayal and revenge, In the Freud Archives is essentially a comedy. But the powerful presence of Freud himself and the harsh bracing air of his ideas about unconscious life hover over the narrative and give it a tragic dimension.

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User Review  - booksaplenty1949 - LibraryThing

I am keenly interested in Freud revisionism but found this heavy going, esp at this distance, when the majority of the dozens of analysts whose names are regularly dropped are retired or dead. The ... Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - lxydis - LibraryThing

An incredibly story and character study and it reads like a thriller! I recently reread this, and, it made me want to read more by and about the charismatic and arrogant Masson and the other nutjob ... Read full review

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About the author (2002)

Janet Malcolm is the author of numerous books, including The Silent Woman, Psychoanalysis: The Impossible Profession, and In the Freud Archives. She has been writing for the New Yorker since 1963, including nearly ten years writing "About the House," a column on interiors and design. Janet lives in New York.

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