In the Houses of the Holy: Led Zeppelin and the Power of Rock Music

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Oxford University Press, Sep 20, 2001 - Music - 272 pages
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This volume examines the powerful ways in which identity can be shaped by rock music. Through the music, imagery and discourse surrounding one of the most innovative and commercially successful rock bands ever, Susan Fast probes such issues as constructions of gender and sexuality, the creation of myth and the use of ritual, the appropriation of Eastern musics and the blues, the physicality of the music, and the use of the body in performance. The band's influence is examined through socially-situated musical analysis, as well as an ethnographic study of Led Zeppelin fans. Fast draws on academic and journalistic writing as well as a new interview with band member John Paul Jones. Specific pieces examined include "Dazed and Confused," "Kashmir," "Stairway to Heaven," and "Whole Lotta Love."
 

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User Review  - talltrickster - LibraryThing

Amazing research and analysis of several Led Zeppelin songs, but too technical for the average non-musician. When Fast focused on the emotional and psychological impact Zeppelin had on fans, that's where the book has great merit. Read full review

Contents

Led Zeppelin and the Carnivalesque
3
Dazed and Confused Intertextuality Ritual Gender
17
Stairway to Heaven Myth Epic Ritual
49
Over the Hills and Far Away Difference and Representation
85
Photo gallery
98
The Wanton Song The Riff and the Body
113
Whole Lotta Love Performing Gender
159
Fan Questionnaire
203
Notes
207
Bibliography
231
DiscographyVideography
239
Index
241
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Page 5 - As opposed to the official feast, one might say that carnival celebrated temporary liberation from the prevailing truth and from the established order; it marked the suspension of all hierarchical rank, privileges, norms, and prohibitions. Carnival was the true feast of time, the feast of becoming, change, and renewal. It was hostile to all that was immortalized and completed.

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