"In the Rocky Mountains": Great Difficulties and Dangers Encountered by Captains Lewis and Clarke; Discoveries of the Headwaters of the Columbia River; Graphically Told

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Superior Printing Company, 1915 - Indians of North America - 186 pages
 

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Page 96 - Opposite to these islands the hills on the left retire, and the river widens into a kind of bay crowded with low islands, subject to be overflowed occasionally by the tide. We had not gone far from this village when the fog cleared off, and we enjoyed the delightful prospect of the ocean— that ocean, the object of all our labors, the reward of all our anxieties.
Page 121 - ... use of it, making a present of a handkerchief to the others. The remainder of the day was passed in good spirits, though there was nothing in our situation to excite much gayety. The rain confined us to the house, and our only luxuries in honour of the season were some poor elk, so much spoiled that we eat it through mere necessity, a few roots, and some spoiled pounded fish.
Page 171 - America, did penetrate the same by the way of the Missouri and Columbia rivers, to the discharge of the latter into the Pacific ocean, where they arrived on the 14th...
Page 170 - The object of this is, that through the medium of some civilized person who may see the same, it may be made known to the world that the party, consisting of the persons whose names are hereunto annexed, and who were sent out by the government of the United States to explore the interior of the continent of North America, did cross the same by the way of...
Page 148 - They are upwards of fifty feet long, and will carry from eight to ten thousand pounds weight, or from twenty to thirty persons. Like all the canoes we have mentioned, they are cut out of a single trunk of a tree, which is generally white cedar, though the fir is sometimes used. The sides are secured by cross-bars, or round sticks, two or three inches in thickness, which are inserted through holes made just below the gunwale, and made fast with cords. The upper edge of the gunwale itself is about...
Page 170 - The object of this list is, that through the medium of some civilized person who may see the same, it may be made known to the informed world...
Page 32 - The buffalo or elk-skin robe decorated with beads, sea-shells, chiefly mother-of-pearl, attached to an otter-skin collar and hung in the hair, which falls in front in two queues; feathers, paints of different kinds, principally white, green, and light blue, all of which they find in their own country : these are the chief ornaments they use. In...
Page 184 - This large building is two hundred and twenty-six feet in front, entirely above ground, and may be considered as a single house, because the whole is under one roof ; otherwise it would seem more like a range of buildings, as it is divided into seven distinct apartments, each thirty feet square, by means of broad boards set on end from the floor to the roof.
Page 96 - We had not gone far from this village when the fog cleared off, and we enjoyed the delightful prospect of the ocean — that ocean, the object of all our labours, the reward of all our anxieties. This cheering view exhilarated the spirits of all the party, who were still more delighted on hearing the distant roar of the breakers.
Page 43 - Sokulk women being more inclined to corpulency than any we have yet seen : their stature is low, their faces broad, and their heads flattened in such a manner, that the forehead is in a straight line from the nose to the crown of the head...

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