In War Time

Front Cover
Houghton, Mifflin, 1885 - United States - 423 pages
0 Reviews
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Selected pages

Contents

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 28 - In a few minutes Wendell, absorbed, was gazing into the microscope at the tiny dramas which the domestic life of a curious pseudopod presented. He soon began to draw it with much adroitness. It is possible for some men to pursue every object, their duties and their pleasures, with equal energy, nor is it always true that the Jack-ofall-trades is master of none ; but it was true of this man that, however well he did things, — and he did many things well, — he did none with sufficient intensity...
Page 93 - ... York, and were then interiorly and vaguely regarded by aged aunts as lost souls. Those who remained in the ancient homesteads, and lived and died adhesive to the soil, held a certain distinct social place and position, passively yielded rather than demanded. It was not always easy to see why a few of these breeds had won early in colonial life, and held so steadily, their places on the upper levels of society.
Page 164 - exclaims the Lance; 'Bear me to the heart of France,' Is the longing of the Shield; Tell thy name, thou trembling field; Field of death, where'er thou be, Groan thou with our victory ! Happy day, and mighty hour, When our Shepherd in his power...
Page 247 - But after they had gone, he still sat moodily thinking. He had already used, little by little, fifteen hundred dollars of Hester's money, — borrowed it, he said to himself, — and the stock he had bought was still falling, and now he was about to lose his contract surgeoncy ! He was with reason afraid at times of the constancy with which ideas haunted him during his moods of despondency. It seemed to him as if there were some mechanism of torture in his mind, which presented troubles over and...
Page 95 - Penn and Barclay generally made themselves heard of in the struggle, and helped to make up a healthy average of active pugnacity for many a kindly, quiet stock which had struck no blow in anger for a century and a half. Out of it all came an increase of life, a freshening of national vitality, which was felt most in the centres of population, and which, stirring all social classes, developed for good or ill whatever there was susceptible of outgrowth alike in old and young. Certainly, no period in...
Page 243 - ... I could give myself up to research altogether." " It does seem hard that you cannot, with your capacities." " How good you are to me, and how well you appear to be able to enter into a man's life and ambitions ! So few people have that power. I can never thank you enough. But good-by. I must go." " You are going ? And why do you go?" " Do you want me to stay ?" " Of course I want you to stay.
Page 39 - " At school. It 'sa girl. I did not tell you it was a girl. She has been at school in Rahway. I could not either get her away or send money to her, and she and I are pretty much alone in the world. By George, I don't suppose she would know me ! " "Why not send for her?" suggested Morton, whose enormous increase in comfort disposed him to indulge his usual desire that everybody about him should be satisfied, provided it did not incommode Major Morton. " We '11 get that doctor of ours to ask his sister...
Page 144 - ... haste a conception as to what Hester was and what she needed. The child's accuracy and exactness in her tasks, as well as her notable conscientiousness, caused Ann to think that she in some ways resembled herself, as in fact she did, in these especial particulars ; but Ann had in her own being no clew to the tangle we call character, and utterly lacked capacity to unravel into distinctiveness of appreciation its changing web and woof. The intelligence of each year of growth is commonly underrated...
Page 38 - I like his face." " Yes ; a nice boy, I should think," returned Wendell. When the two officers, the next morning, were eagerly eating a well-cooked breakfast, in their new and cheerful quarters, under the care of an orderly assigned to them by Wendell, Morton, who was in high good-humor, remarked, " By George, this is better than that ward ! I feel like myself.
Page 138 - A sun-dial, Miss Gray. Why on earth should I be ' Edward ' and ' Ned ' yesterday, and ' Mr. Edward ' to-day ? " " Mrs. Morton says I must n't call you ' Edward.' " " Nonsense ! No, I don't mean that. I will speak to mamma about it. I suppose Arty is not promoted." " What ? I don't understand." " I mean, he is still to be Arty ? I can tell you I won't stand that ! " "And did you never see a sun-dial?" exclaimed Arthur. "No, never; but I have heard of them." " My grandfather set it here when he came...

Bibliographic information