Independent Witness

Front Cover
House of Stratus, Nov 28, 2008 - Fiction - 204 pages
0 Reviews
Mr Justice Grampion hates dangerous drivers and believes it is his duty to give very severe sentences to those who offend. He is well-known for his opinion on the matter, so, when Michael Barnes, MP, is to be tried for a very serious motoring charge, he is devastated to hear that Grampion will be the judge. To make Michael's problems worse he has no witness to support his story. Ranged against him are a host of independent witnesses whose testimonies are hilarious and often contradictory. While this is another highly amusing novel from Henry Cecil it also examines the serious nature of truth and reality as perceived by different witnesses.
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

I
1
II
7
III
14
IV
25
V
31
VI
40
VII
50
VIII
57
XI
99
XII
111
XIII
122
XIV
135
XV
148
XVI
154
XVII
167
XVIII
186

IX
62
X
82
XIX
193
Copyright

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

About the author (2008)

Henry Cecil, known to many as His Honour Judge H.C. Leon, MC, was a High Court judge as well as a famous author. He wrote during the three-week-long family holidays which were usually spent in comfortable hotels in Britain. He would sit in a deck chair in a sunny garden, exercise book on lap and pen in hand, writing from 10 am to 1pm, then again from 2.30 to 4 pm each day. His writing career is attributed to his Second World War experiences. Sailing around the Cape on a 'dry' troop ship on the way to Cairo, the colonel asked his adjutant (Cecil) to tell stories to keep the officers' minds off alcohol. The stories were so popular that they became a regular feature, and formed the basis of his first collection, 'Full Circle', published in 1948. Thereafter, the legal year, his impressions at court, or at other official functions, as well as dinners at the Savoy Grill or at his club, the Garrick, all provided material for his considerable brain power. Many of his stories were made into films or plays - notably 'Brothers-in-Law' and 'Alibi for a Judge'. These and other books have also provided a stimulus for those wishing to take up law as a career. They are a delight for those who look for authenticity in the most aptly described British characters. Cecil died in May 1976, still at the height of his mental powers.

Bibliographic information