Indian Basketry: And How to Make Indian and Other Baskets

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H. Malkan, 1903 - Basket making - 407 pages
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Contents

Dance of Basket Bearers
45
Yolo Ceremonial Basket
46
Saboba Basket Maker
48
Basket Making People
50
4646 Alaska Baskets Plimpton Coll
52
Washington Weaver
54
Washington Weaver
55
Ornamental Poma Baskets
58
Poma Basket Plimpton Coll
60
Datsolalee Washoe
62
Baskets Burnell Coll
64
Oraibi Basket Maker
65
Chemehuevi Basket
66
Menominis Weaving Mat
67
69a Yokut Girl Weavers
70
Materials Used in Indian Basketry
72
Cahullla Colled Baskets etc
73
Fine California Baskets
74
Portion of the Plimpton Coll
75
Apache and Pima Baskets
76
7677 Poma Baskets Plimpton Coll
78
Yokut and Poma Basket
79
Campbell Coll
80
Yokut Dance and Other Baskets
82
Hopl and Havasupai Baskets
83
Apache and Pima Bowls etc
84
8384 Bone Awls
86
Oraibi Yucca Basket
87
Colors in Indian Basketry
88
Yokut Basket
92
Yokut Basket Plimpton Coll 92 88 Pshu Kan or Fish Net
94
Bamtush Weave
95
Weaves or Stitches of Indian Basketry
96
BamTush Granary and ShiBu Tray
97
ShuSet and Ti Weaves
98
Poma Basket Material
99
Baskets In WUcomb Collection
100
Poma ShiBu
101
Poma Tsai and Bamtsuwu
102
to 102 Poma Ornamental Shibu
103
Eel River Baskets
104
Pauma Granary etc
105
Apache Basket Plimpton Coll
106
Apache Water Bottle
107
Hopi Weaver
109
Fig Page 109 Inch Weave of Hopl Tray
110
Unornamented Oraibi Plaque
112
Oraibi Sacred Meal Tray
113
Hopl Carrying Basket
114
Seminole Basket
116
Pima Basket Plimpton Coll
117
California Basket do
118
Basket Forms and Designs Their Origin and Relation to Art
119
Pueblo Sleeping Mat
120
Yakima Basket
121
12789 Simple Weaves One Color
122
Herring Bone Effect
123
Clallam Carrying Basket
125
13567 Various Surface Effects
126
Open Work Tray Klamath
127
Simple Reticulated Weave
128
Apache Basket With Pendants
129
1456 Use of Colored Strands
130
Alternations of Fillets
131
Base of Coiled Basket
132
Yokut Basket
133
McCloud Carrying Basket
135
Oraibi Sacred Tray
136
Oraibi Do
137
Light Fillets Wrapped
138
1612 Ornamental California Baskets
139
Conventional Figures
140
Figure of Bird on Hopi Tray
142
167a Yokut Woman Carrying Lead of Fruit
143
Tule Weaver Using Sifter
144
Some Uses of Indian Baskets
145
Primitive Fish Weir
146
Basket of Thompson Indians
147
Poma With Wood Basket
148
Zuni Toy Cradle and Doll
149
Poma Mother With Child
150
17789 Hupa Cradle Basket
151
18234 Hopi Wicker Cradles
152
18567 Siamese Carrying Basket
153
Method of Making Havasupai Water Bottles
163
Hopi House Interior
164
Saucer Shaped Basket
165
Ornamented Apache Bowl
166
22930 Point Barrow Baskets
167
Large Granary 168
170
Various Indian Baskets 169
171
Cahuilla Do
172
Inside View of Fig 237
174
Coiled Jar Zuni
175
Apache Basket Bowl
177
Paiuti Basket
178
Ute Basket Hat
179
Paiuti Roasting Tray
180
Paiuti Harvesting Wand
181
25678 Makah Bottle Basket
182
Clallam Bird Cage Weave
183
Makah Trinket Basket
184
Square Inch of Fig 262
185
Haida Hat
186
Symbolism of Indian Basketry
187
Yokut HeartShaped Basket
188
S Cal Baskets
190
a Symbolism in Basketry Forms
191
Baskets Spoiled by Vicious Imitation
192
b Developement of Symbolism in Basket Designs
194
27678 Typical Basket Decorations
195
281282 Pottery Designs
196
c Imitation and Conventionalization
197
Pottery Design from Basketry
198
Hartts Fret Theory
199
d The Birth and Developement of Geometrical Designs
201
Havasupal Design
203
Geometrical Spiral on Apache Basket
204
Do on Pottery
205
e Diverse Meanings of Designs
206
Baskets in Campbell Collection
207
f Designs of Animal Origin
208
Dasolales Masterpiece
209
g Designs of Vegetable Origin
212
h Designs of Natural Origin
213
Poetic Saboba Design
214
i Designs of Artifact Origin
215
j Baskets With Mixed Designs
216
Design of Flying Bats
217
The Poetry of Indian Basketry
218
Ramona and Star Basket
221
Baskets to be Prized
224
The Decadence of the Art
226
How the Art may be Preserved
229
Hints to the Collector
230
Bibliography of Indian Basketry
232
Appendix
234
Quail Design
235
Ducks Wing Design
236
Eye Design
237
Flower Design 287
238
Bush Design
239
Feather Design 239 325 Feather Design 240 326 Feather Design 239 327 Feather Design
240
Arrow Point Design
241
Pima Weaver
243
Pima Baskets Benham Coll 243 334 Apache Baskets Benham Coll
245
Apache Basket Benham Coll 245 337 Various Baskets In Benham Coll
246
California Baskets Benham Coll
248
Mono Flour Sifters
252
Mono Baskets Rattlesnake Design
254
Hill Collection
256
Aleut Baskets Frohman Coll 258 349 Yakutat Baskets Frohman Coll
260
Calif Baskets Frohman Coll
262
Klikitat Weavers 8
264
Baby Baskets
265
Various Baskets Frohman Coll
266
Index
267
Various Baskets Frohman Coll
268
How to Make Indian and Other Baskets 273
1
ILLUSTRATIONS
2
Havasupal With Kathak 12 17 Cradle of Nevada Utes 22
22
A Poma Basket Maker 9 i8 19 Hopl Basket and Weave 24
24
S California Baskets 14 21 Carrying Basket of Hopls 25
25
Choctaw Baskets of Cane IB 22 Hopl Basket of Yucca 26
26
Havasupal Roasting Tray 17 23 Apache Basket Bottle 28
28
Jf ffi Havasupal Making Basket 29
29
Original Method of Making Pottery 18 26 Poma Pounding Acorns 30
30
Basemould for Colled Pottery 19 Sacred Baskets of Navahoes etc 32
32

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Page 93 - ... This is my flag, and it represents the world. God told me to look after my people — all are my people. There are four ways in the world — north and south and east and west. I have been all those ways. This is the center. I live here. The red spot is my heart — everybody can see it. The yellow grass grows everywhere around this place. The green mountains are far away all around the world. There is only water beyond, salt water. The blue [referring to the blue cloth strip] is the sky, and...
Page 85 - ... closely and the resulting fabric is full of interstices. Sumac and willow are prepared for use in the same way. The bark is removed from the fresh shoots by biting it loose at the end and tearing it off. The woody portion is scraped to remove bud protuberances and other inequalities of the surface, and is then allowed to dry. These slender pieces of wood, that they may be distinguished from the other elements of basket materials, will be called withes. The second element is prepared from the...
Page 65 - ... the same as that with which the sewing is done, at others a strip of leaf or bast. The stitches pass over the rod and strip which are on top down under the welt only of the coil below, the stitches interlocking. The strip of tough fiber FIG.
Page 91 - ... (whippoorwill) feathers. Etseastin and Etseasun carried these to a spring, placing them toward the cardinal points. The eagle plumes were laid to the east and near by them white corn and white shell ; the blue feathers were laid to the south with blue corn and turquoise ; the hawk feathers were laid to the west with yellow corn and abalone shell ; and to the north were laid the whippoorwill feathers with black beads and corn of all the several colors.
Page 65 - A little attention to figure 23 will demonstrate that the alternate rod or the upper rod in each pair will be inclosed in two series of stitches, while the other or lower rod will pass along freely in the middle of one series of stitches and show on the outer side. Examples of this two-rod foundation are to be seen among the Athapascan tribes of Alaska, among the Pomo Indians of the Pacific coast, and among the Apache of Arizona. An...
Page 85 - The second element is prepared from the same plants. A squaw selects a fresh shoot, breaks off the too slender upper portion, and bites one end so that it starts to split into three nearly equal parts. Holding one of these p.arts in her teeth and one in either hand, she pulls them apart, guiding the split with her fingers so dexterously that the whole shoot is divided into three equal even portions.
Page 65 - ... or the upper rod in each pair will be inclosed in two series of stitches, while the other or lower rod will pass along freely in the middle of one series of stitches and show on the outer side. Examples of this two-rod foundation are to be seen among the Athapascan tribes of Alaska, among the Pomo Indians of the Pacific coast, and among the Apache of Arizona. An interesting or specialized variety of this type is seen among the Mescaleros of New Mexico, who use the two-rod foundation, but instead...
Page 85 - ... the thickness therefore of one of these bundles, and is composed of a continuous spiral of them. The willow withe furnishes a strong hold for the stitches, and the punctures are made by an iron awl. When such an instrument cannot be obtained an admirable equivalent is substituted in the form of a stout, horny cactus spine from the devil's pin-cushion, Echinocactus polycephalus, set in a head of hard pitch. The grass stems, when the stitches are drawn tightly, make a perfect packing, and the basket...
Page 126 - It is the most elegant and intricate of all in the woven or plicated species. Twined work has a set of warp rods or rigid elements, as in wickerwork; but the weft elements are commonly administered in pairs, though in three-ply twining and in braid twining three weft elements are employed. In...
Page 59 - There are specimens delicately made that will pass through a lady's finger ring, and others as large as a flour barrel; some specimens have stitching material one-half inch wide, as in the Pima granaries, and in others the root material is shredded so fine that nearly 100 stitches are made within an inch of space. In form the coiled ware may be perfectly flat, as in a table mat, or built up into the most exquisite jar shape. In design the upright stitthes lend themselves to the greatest variety of...

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