Indian Wars and Famous Frontiersmen: The Thrilling Story of Pioneer Life in America ... Embracing the Principal Episodes in the Struggle of the White Race with the Red Men for the Possession of the New World ...

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Montgomery Ward & Company, 1904 - Frontier and pioneer life - 618 pages
 

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My dad read to me every night from this book. It was my bedtime story book.

Contents

I
33
II
82
III
126
IV
150
V
210
VI
267
VII
320
VIII
335
XI
382
XII
421
XIII
451
XIV
485
XV
521
XVI
537
XVII
586
XVIII
607

IX
345
X
370

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Page 38 - WE, greatly commending, and graciously accepting of, their Desires for the Furtherance of so noble a Work, which may, by the Providence of Almighty God, hereafter tend to the Glory of his Divine Majesty, in propagating of Christian Religion to such People, as yet live in Darkness and miserable Ignorance of the true Knowledge and Worship of God, and may in time bring the Infidels and Savages, living in those Parts, to human Civility, and to a settled and quiet Government; DO, by these our Letters...
Page 42 - Towell to dry them: having feasted him after their best barbarous manner they could, a long consultation was held, but the conclusion was, two great stones were brought before Powhatan: then as many as could...
Page 162 - My father," said the wily traitor, " will sleep to-night in the lodges of his red children." Campbell expostulated, he argued the matter to Pontiac with enforced calmness. Useless — he was a captive. Late that night La Butte returned with anxious face to the fort. Some of the officers suspected him, no doubt unjustly, of a share in the treachery. Feeling the suspicion, he stood in the narrow street, gloomy and silent, refusing all efforts at conversation. Pontiac proceeded to redistribute his forces....
Page 177 - ... presented myself full in view to the Indians who were entering the room. They were all in a state of intoxication, and entirely naked, except about the middle. One of them, named Wenniway, whom I had previously known, and who was...
Page 177 - Langlade that they had not found my hapless self among the dead, and they supposed me to be somewhere concealed. M. Langlade appeared, from what followed, to be, by this time, acquainted with the place of my retreat ; of which, no doubt, he had been informed by his wife. The poor woman, as soon as the Indians mentioned me, declared to her husband, in the French tongue, that he should no longer keep me in his house, but deliver me up to my pursuers ; giving as a reason for this measure, that, should...
Page 159 - To-morrow, she said, Pontiac will come to the fort with sixty of his chiefs. Each will be armed with a gun, cut short, and hidden under his blanket. Pontiac will demand to hold a council ; and after he has delivered his speech, he will offer a peacebelt of wampum, holding it in a reversed position.
Page 140 - Take your revenge, but don't forget that, though those dastardly villains have promiscuously murdered women and children of all ages, it is my order that no women or children be killed or hurt.
Page 229 - You are two brothers of one blood. We are unwilling to join on either side in such a contest, for we bear an equal affection to both Old and New England. Should the great king of England apply to us for aid, we shall deny him ; if the colonies apply we shall refuse. The present situation of you two brothers is new and strange to us. We Indians can not find, nor recollect, in the traditions of our ancestors, the like case or a similar instance.
Page 50 - Crowne, nor bending of the knee, endured so many perswasions, examples, and instructions, as tyred them all ; at last by leaning hard on his shoulders, he a little stooped, and three having the crowne in their hands put it on his head...
Page 180 - Shortly after, two of the Indians took one of the dead bodies, which they chose as being the fattest, cut off the head, and divided the whole into five parts, one of which was put into each of five kettles, hung over as many fires kindled for this purpose, at the door of the prison-lodge. Soon after things were so far prepared, a message came to our lodge, with an invitation to Wawatam, to assist at the feast. "An invitation to a feast is given by him who is the master of it. Small cuttings of...

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