Indignant Heart: A Black Worker's Journal

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Wayne State University Press, 1989 - Biography & Autobiography - 303 pages

Charles Denby's autobiography is a testament to the struggle for freedom. In the first part of his story, Denby recounts the hardships he endured growing up as a Black in the rural South. He escapes to the North only to discover a more sophisticated form of
racism and bondage. The second part of his story, written 25 years after the first, chronicles his experiences in the mid-1950s as the Civil Rights Movement was about to explode. We hear his stories as an active participant in all the mass struggles of the next two decades-from the 1956 Montgomery
Bus Boycott to the 1967 uprising in Detroit and the Black Caucuses in the unions that followed. It is from his participation in these human rights struggles that Denby's prose gains its force. This new edition contains an introduction by the prominent Black labor historian William Harris and an appendix by the revolutionary philosopher Raya Dunayevskaya.

 

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Contents

Childhood in the South
1
North to Detroit
27
Back to the South
37
My Wife Christine
44
Work in the South
50
Work in the South II
69
Work in the North
87
Detroit Riots 1943
110
Visiting Montgomery
181
Little Rock Greensboro Oxford
190
The FBI Does Nothing The Murder of Viola Liuzzo
202
The Bombing of the Churches
208
The AntiVietnam War Movement
226
Watergate and the Communist Giants
238
Challenging the Bureaucrats
245
DRUM ELRUM FRUM and the Stinger
262

The Left Wing Caucus of the UAW
120
South With My Son
135
Christine in the Plant
142
The Communist Party
163
With the Wildcatters
272
Worldwide Struggle for Freedom
282
Afterword by Raya Dunayevskaya
289
Copyright

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About the author (1989)

Charles Denby was born and raised in the south, and had first-hand experience with class struggle, Black revolts, and freedom movements. He was editor of News & Letters and contributor to the Worker's Journal column.

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