Indus Age: The Writing System

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University of Pennsylvania Press, 1996 - Social Science - 244 pages
This is a book about the undeciphered writing system of the Indus Civilization. Their pictographic script was invented by the people of Mohenjo-daro and Harappa, and over a thousand other known settlements, in Pakistan and northwestern India. It was in use for about 600 years, 2500-1900 BC. Many attempts have been made to decipher this writing system. All of them have to be judged to be failures, at least in so far as can be proved by independent tests. This book is not another attempt at decipherment. It is an in-depth survey of the nature of Indus writing and a comprehensive review of the most prominent decipherment efforts. The book ends with a discussion of the progress that has been made at decipherment, with some thoughts on the direction that future research should take.

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Contents

AN INTRODUCTION TO THE INDUS CIVILIZATION AND
1
THE MATURE URBAN HARAPPAN
11
SEALS AND WRITING IN THE DISCOVERY OF THE INDUS AGE
19
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About the author (1996)

Gregory L. Possehl is Professor and Chair of the Department of Anthropology at the University of Pennsylvania and Curator-in-Charge of the Asia Section of the University of Pennsylvania Museum.

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