Infant Tongues: The Voice of the Child in Literature

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Elizabeth Goodenough, Mark A. Heberle, Naomi B. Sokoloff
Wayne State University Press, 1994 - Literary Criticism - 331 pages
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This work examines the representation of children in literature from the Renaissance to the present. It covers texts written in English, French, German, Russian and Hebrew, and looks at the evolution of the child's voice and consciousness in adult and juvenile fiction, and in writing by children.
 

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Contents

The Voice of the Child Both Godly and Unregenerate in Early Modern England
16
Xing John and Shakespeares Children
28
The ChildReader of Childrens Bibles 16561753
44
Maria Edgeworths WeeWee Stories
57
Marjory Fleming and Her Diaries
80
Russian Literary Culture
110
Lawrences PassionalParental View of Childhood
164
The Silence of Children in the Novels of Virginia Woolf
184
BabyTalk and the Language of Dos Passoss
202
The Changing Language of Black Child Characters in American Childrens Books
225
Childrens Voices in Holocaust Literature
259
Is Anybody Out There Listening? Fairy Tales and the Voice of the Child
275
Mark Jonathan Harris
284
David Shields
290
Laurie Ricou
302
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