Information Arts: Intersections of Art, Science, and Technology

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MIT Press, 2002 - Art - 945 pages
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A new breed of contemporary artist engages science and technology -- not just to adopt the vocabulary and gizmos, but to explore and comment on the content, agendas, and possibilities. Indeed, proposes Stephen Wilson, the role of the artist is not only to interpret and to spread scientific knowledge, but to be an active partner in determining the direction of research. Years ago, C. P. Snow wrote about the "two cultures" of science and the humanities; these developments may finally help to change the outlook of those who view science and technology as separate from the general culture.

In this rich compendium, Wilson offers the first comprehensive survey of international artists who incorporate concepts and research from mathematics, the physical sciences, biology, kinetics, telecommunications, and experimental digital systems such as artificial intelligence and ubiquitous computing. In addition to visual documentation and statements by the artists, Wilson examines relevant art-theoretical writings and explores emerging scientific and technological research likely to be culturally significant in the future. He also provides lists of resources including organizations, publications, conferences, museums, research centers, and Web sites.

 

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The first chapter has relevant to my ophera research(page 1-48)

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About the author (2002)

David Steinberg, M.D., is an Assistant Clinical Professor of Medicine at Harvard Medical School and a board certified hematologist oncologist who practices at the Lahey Clinic in Burlington, Massachusetts. He is also Chief, Section of Medical Ethics at the Lahey Clinic Medical Center and editor of The Lahey Clinic Medical Ethics Newsletter.

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