Information Technology for Management: Transforming Organizations in the Digital Economy

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Information technology has changed how businesses operate and succeed in today’s global economy. Organizations can now use IT to transform themselves and achieve a tremendous competitive advantage. Information Technology for Management: Transforming Organizations in the Digital Economy, Seventh Edition highlights how this new technology is changing the current business environment and what effect it has on today’s students.  The text addresses the major principles of MIS in order to prepare managers to understand the role of information technology in the digital economy. Revised and updated for a junior or senior level MIS or MBA course, this title will give students what they need to succeed in the emerging digital economy.

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About the author (2010)

Dr. Efraim Turban obtained his MBA and Ph.D. degrees form the University of California, Berkeley. His industry experience includes eight years as an industrial engineer, three of which were spent at General Electric Transformers Plant in Oakland, California. He also has extensive consulting experience to small and large corporations as well as to governments. In his over thirty years of teaching, professor Turban has served as Chaired Professor at Nanyang Technological University in Singapore, and University of Science and Technology, in Hong Kong. He has also taught at UCLA; USC; Simon Fraser University; Lehigh University; California State University; Long Beach; and Florida International University. Dr. Turban was a co–recipient of the 1984/85 National Management Science Award (Artificial Intelligence in Management),. In 1997 he received the Distinguished Faculty Scholarly and Creative Achievement Award at California State University, Long Beach. Professor Turban is currently on the faculty of City University of Hong Kong, Department of Information Systems, Faculty of Business Administration. Professor Turban′s current major interest is electronic commerce, strategy, and implementation. Dr. Ephraim McLean obtained his Bachelor of Mechanical Engineering degree from Cornell University in 1958. After brief service in the U.S. Army Ordinance Corps, he worked for Proctor & Gamble Co. for seven years, first in manufacturing management and later as a computer systems analyst. In 1965, he left P&G and entered the Sloan School of Management at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, obtaining his master′s degree in 1967 and his doctorate in 1970. While at MIT, he began an interest in application of computer technology to medicine, working on his dissertation at the Lahey Clinic in Boston. While there, he was instrumental in developing the Lahey Clinic Automated Medical History System. During the same period, he served as an instructor at MIT and also assisted in the preparation of the books The Impact of Computers on Management (MIT Press, 1967); The Impact of Computers on Collective Bargaining (MIT Press, 1969); and Computers in Knowledge–Based Fields (MIT Press, 1970). Dr. McLean left MIT and joined the faculty of the Anderson Graduate School of Management at the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA) in the winter of 1970. He was the founding Director of the Information Systems Research Program and the first Chairman of the Information Systems area, both within the Anderson Graduate School of Management. In fall 1987, he was named to the George E. Smith Eminent Scholar′s Chair at the College of Business Administration at Georgia State University in Atlanta, Georgia. Dr. James C. Wetherbe is Stevenson Chair of Information technology at Texas Tech University as well as Professor of MIS at the University of Minnesota where he directed the MIS Research Center for 20 years. He is internationally known as a dynamic and entertaining speaker, author, and leading authority on the use of computers and information systems to improve organizational performance and competitiveness. He is particularly appreciated for his ability to explain complex technology in straightforward, practical terms that can be strategically applied by both executives and general management. Dr. Wetherbe is the author of 18 highly regarded books and is quoted often in leading business and information systems journals. He has also authored over 200 articles, was ranked by InformationWEEK as one of the top dozen information technology consultants, and is the first recipient of the MIS Quarterly Distinguished Scholar Award. He has also served on the faculties of the University of Memphis, where he was FedEx Professor and Director of the Center for Cycle Time Research, and the University of Houston. Dr. Wetherbe received his Ph.D. from Texas Tech Unviersity.

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